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View Full Version : Help my Fly River Turtle--Is this Shell Rot/Fungal Infections?



AroW
02-14-2009, 1:28 PM
Pictures attached. Turtle is still eating well and swimming. I was told that it appeared more or less "suddenly". Never had any disease before even as a baby. The only suspect I can think of are
1. Pleco sucking on it (they have coexisted for years however
2. It got spooked and injured itself one night
3. Fungal infection. Water parameters check out however.

What does my FRT have and how do I treat it? I have raised it for the longest time and do not want to lose it.


Thanks! :)


Note: Affected areas are under the head and on top of the shell. The turtle is not with me at the moment and these are the clearest pictures I could get.

all_or_nothin
02-14-2009, 1:38 PM
what size tank and what kind of turtle is that? its fiins look like a sea turtle's fins

Gr8KarmaSF
02-14-2009, 1:47 PM
1. Pleco sucking on it (they have coexisted for years however)

Plecos can still turn on you at any given moment. Thou from the pics it doesnt look like a pleco attack, when plecos do turn the injuries are usually round and in the shape of their mouths.

2. It got spooked and injured itself one night

Doubtful, whats your decor?

3. Fungal infection. Water parameters check out however.

What are your water numbers? ph? It looks to me like a fungal or bacterial infection. My FRT once had it and I aggressively treated it through dips and such.

One thing to be VERY careful of is to watch out if it spreads to its nose, once there it can very easily get its nostrils closed and drown. If I were you I would start by doing a several small water changes....

andyjs
02-14-2009, 2:20 PM
what size tank and what kind of turtle is that? its fiins look like a sea turtle's fins
It's a Fly River Turtle...you know, like the post title says....

Jfitz
02-14-2009, 2:31 PM
It's a Fly River Turtle...you know, like the post title says....
he probly didnt know what an frt was... and you still haven't given the tank size.

evilxyardxgnome
02-14-2009, 2:33 PM
What an odd combo. Goldfish, some sort of carp, a snook, and a dat as well as the FRT.

andyjs
02-14-2009, 2:46 PM
What an odd combo. Goldfish, some sort of carp, a snook, and a dat as well as the FRT.
Don't forget the pleco, what looks like a pim, maybe a silver dollar?, some barbs, bala shark, and a bichir...

AroW
02-14-2009, 3:14 PM
Thanks Gr8! Yes, the mixture of fish is a bit odd at the moment, but it is what it is for now. Everybody gets along well though.

Schmike
02-14-2009, 8:49 PM
looks like some scratches to me. can't confirm since the pics are not very clear.

by the way, those gravels dont look safe for a FRT to me. the chin might be due to some infection on closer look. could be caused by some bacteria thriving in the gravel.

Mike D
02-14-2009, 8:53 PM
tank size? and what are the water parameters?

spexmoneymaker
02-17-2009, 12:20 AM
that frt looks sad

Armand
02-17-2009, 1:24 AM
A fly river turtle is a pretty uncommon spicies!!!!.

Look for what I know those marks in the sell are a caratheristic of the spicies, it is also know as Pitted shell turtle. You should check it out.

shells-n-scales
02-17-2009, 11:28 AM
Send it to me... I'll fix him up... and swap you for a smaller one

wild caught
02-17-2009, 12:31 PM
lots of people would kill to have one, fix him up!

bettagurl
02-17-2009, 12:35 PM
Dude... Those fish aren't even compatible...

What tank size?

emk
02-17-2009, 1:44 PM
Remove the turtle and place it in a separate cleaned area / large container.

Allow the turtle and shell to "dry" or gently pat dry the shell with a clean cloth towel.

With a soft toothbrush, GENTLY wipe the affected areas on the shell (but not the neck!).

Thoroughly apply liberal amounts Betadine (found at most drug stores) to the affected areas on the shell.

Swab the infected neck area with Betadine using Q-tips.

Also using a Q-tip, apply Nolvasan or Neosporin ointment (also found at most drug stores) to the affected areas on the shell. You can also add some to the neck area.

Leave the turtle in this area / container for at least an hour or two before returning to the tank (observe and keep an eye on the turtle while it is in the area / container because it may try to climb out and inadvertently hurt itself or flip over.

Repeat the procedure every day

Good luck.

coura
02-17-2009, 3:20 PM
Remove the turtle and place it in a separate cleaned area / large container.

Allow the turtle and shell to "dry" or gently pat dry the shell with a clean cloth towel.

With a soft toothbrush, GENTLY wipe the affected areas on the shell (but not the neck!).

Thoroughly apply liberal amounts Betadine (found at most drug stores) to the affected areas on the shell.

Swab the infected neck area with Betadine using Q-tips.

Also using a Q-tip, apply Nolvasan or Neosporin ointment (also found at most drug stores) to the affected areas on the shell. You can also add some to the neck area.

Leave the turtle in this area / container for at least an hour or two before returning to the tank (observe and keep an eye on the turtle while it is in the area / container because it may try to climb out and inadvertently hurt itself or flip over.

Repeat the procedure every day

Good luck.
Woa woa:eek: do you think this is a slider or what? Betadine or anything containing iodine IS WAY TO STRONG AND AGRESSIVE TO USE ON A FRT:nilly::screwy: The only thing that is going to do is to irritate or even seven BURN the turtle´s delicate skin and then the skin infection will become a lesser evil comparing to the damage that "treatement" will do:nilly: And you sugest leaving the turtle there for 1 or 2 HOURS:irked: And out of the water!:eek: That will do some very bad damage all rigth:nilly::nilly:Seriously its pretty obvious to me that you dont know zinch about softshell turtles or fly river turtles or else you wouldnt recomend any of that kind of "advise". Dont make it worse then it already is for pit sake:irked:
As for the poor turtle (and lets prayt it is still betadine free):
That tank is WAY overpopulated, wich is more then enough to foul the water pretty bad and to compromise the turts imune sistem wich lead to the desiase. First step: REMOVE ALL of thouse fish, nothing but trobble will come from them.
Second replace at least 80% of the water, clean the filters and ad stress coat to the water. Check the water temp it should allways be in the high 80´s. In a separate bugget (big enough to keep the turt confortably in wille totaly submerged) your going to treat the turtle with fish antifungal and fish general topic. A 20 minute salt water bath will also help. Also make shure the ph is high in the main tank and if necessary ad some rift ciclid salts. That will do the trick:D

Tom500
02-17-2009, 3:26 PM
What size tank is it as it looks very cramped especially with all those other fish.

Will Hayward
02-17-2009, 3:41 PM
You'll probably have better luck in future with a soft substrate like fine sand, mud or small 1-2mm rounded gravel. This will help with abrasions that can occur, like what may have happened on his throat. Shrap stone like slate or lavarock should not be used. Instead used soft rounded riverstone or large pebbles.

Fungal infections and Skin rot seem all too common in FRTs. Something less invasive like Methalyne Blue can be added to deter fungus in the event of skin abrasions. Other medications like natural Tea Tree oils like Melaleuca can be used. Use Melafix for Antibacterial infections and Pimafix for Fungal infections.

I'll also comment on the fish stock and suggest that there are many better alternatives to what you are keeping with your FRTs.

coura
02-17-2009, 3:50 PM
You'll probably have better luck in future with a soft substrate like fine sand, mud or small 1-2mm rounded gravel. This will help with abrasions that can occur, like what may have happened on his throat. Shrap stone like slate or lavarock should not be used. Instead used soft rounded riverstone or large pebbles.

Fungal infections and Skin rot seem all too common in FRTs. Something less invasive like Methalyne Blue can be added to deter fungus in the event of skin abrasions. Other medications like natural Tea Tree oils like Melaleuca can be used. Use Melafix for Antibacterial infections and Pimafix for Fungal infections.

I'll also comment on the fish stock and suggest that there are many better alternatives to what you are keeping with your FRTs.
:grinyes::thumbsup:

Tom500
02-17-2009, 3:55 PM
:grinyes::thumbsup:


:grinyes::thumbsup: x2

emk
02-17-2009, 5:52 PM
Woa woa:eek: do you think this is a slider or what? Betadine or anything containing iodine IS WAY TO STRONG AND AGRESSIVE TO USE ON A FRT:nilly::screwy: And you sugest leaving the turtle there for 1 or 2 HOURS:irked: And out of the water!:eek: That will do some very bad damage all rigth:nilly::nilly:Seriously its pretty obvious to me that you dont know zinch about softshell turtles or fly river turtles..


Obviously you must correct the initial problems, such as water quality, diet, and even temperature so I don't disagree with you wholeheartedly. The pictures do show the turtle at the onset of problems, so I do admit that using less severe methods such as correcting the environment should be utilized first.

Betadine can be toxic to some aquatic turtles, but it is NOT too strong for an FRT. I have conferred with people that are very experienced turtle handlers as well as a biologist friend who specializes in reptiles.

I have used this method many times on turtles whose owners did not give the proper care to their turtles. Some of their turtles were severely injured, their shells bitten extensively. All of them recovered. In fact I am presently treating an frt that has a few severe (much worst than pictured) pits on the shell and it is healing well, albeit it is a slow process.

So please don't say this is ineffective if you haven't tried it yourself. Again, this is based not only on experienced and qualified owners, but also my own experiences over many years treating many FRT's.

Also, FRT's can stay out of the water for extended periods of time. Although they are fine completely submerged, if given the opportunity they will bask and do so regularly in the wild.

Creature
02-17-2009, 6:18 PM
Hello:
As someone said earlier, The Fly River Turtle is also known as the Pitted-Shelled Turtle. They are from New Guinea though there have been a few taken from Australian waters.
They like to have flowing water but the pitting in the shell (not shell rot, there is a difference) is normal. as they grow larger it becomes more prevalent. These guys have a velvety coating over the shell plates so you do not want to rub any of that away with a toothbrush as the velvet (I think) does not grow back.
I had one of these guys for over twelve years and she was a great turtle. She was pretty big and had some pitting on the shell but not all that much. They really are very neat and healthy turtles.
Have a Great Day!!!

coura
02-18-2009, 6:10 AM
Obviously you must correct the initial problems, such as water quality, diet, and even temperature so I don't disagree with you wholeheartedly. The pictures do show the turtle at the onset of problems, so I do admit that using less severe methods such as correcting the environment should be utilized first.

Betadine can be toxic to some aquatic turtles, but it is NOT too strong for an FRT. I have conferred with people that are very experienced turtle handlers as well as a biologist friend who specializes in reptiles.

I have used this method many times on turtles whose owners did not give the proper care to their turtles. Some of their turtles were severely injured, their shells bitten extensively. All of them recovered. In fact I am presently treating an frt that has a few severe (much worst than pictured) pits on the shell and it is healing well, albeit it is a slow process.

So please don't say this is ineffective if you haven't tried it yourself. Again, this is based not only on experienced and qualified owners, but also my own experiences over many years treating many FRT's.

Also, FRT's can stay out of the water for extended periods of time. Although they are fine completely submerged, if given the opportunity they will bask and do so regularly in the wild.
I think your confusing Fly river turtles or pig nouse turtles Carettochelys insculpta with softshell turtles Trionixidae. First of pig nouse or fly river turtles only come out of the water to lay eggs, they are 100% aquatic turtles, they dont bask or anything like it in the wild and a fly river turtle that comes regulary to "bask" is allmost certainly sick or trying to avoid being atacked by other turtle. They dont need to bask as their natural home in New guinea and North aussi is constantly warm and they are perfectly adapted to it. They are much like a freshwater version of a sea turtle. They dont withstand being out of the water for to long. Aparently if they do they will get ulcers from their own weigh. Softshell turtles are much more well adapted to land locomocion and they will bask, often with the company of hard shell species.
Second that treatement works and Ive used it in hardshell turtles, but even on them I dont use that quantity and I dont let them soak on it for that period of time. That can kill or at least cause alot of pain in a turt that is already injuried. Its the same thing of you being with a alot of wounds in your skin and then someone making you soak in a tub of alcool(THAT`S GOTA HURT:grinno:) for a hour. And now making that to a fly river turtle or a softshell turtle for that mater, with their delicate skin wich probably burns even if not wonded in such a strong substance. If the infectin doesant kill them the "cure" will. The treatement I sugest Ive used MANY times in more then 16 species of turtles, and even if saltwater can get ichy its far from hurting them the way that possibly can. And then it can enter and will enter its mouth and eyes and nouse...:nilly::nilly:Its reall painfull and unconfortable for them:irked: Please reconsider you husbandry metods because as far as i go you havent earned any of my respect as a keeper:screwy:

coura
02-18-2009, 6:12 AM
Hello:
As someone said earlier, The Fly River Turtle is also known as the Pitted-Shelled Turtle. They are from New Guinea though there have been a few taken from Australian waters.
They like to have flowing water but the pitting in the shell (not shell rot, there is a difference) is normal. as they grow larger it becomes more prevalent. These guys have a velvety coating over the shell plates so you do not want to rub any of that away with a toothbrush as the velvet (I think) does not grow back.
I had one of these guys for over twelve years and she was a great turtle. She was pretty big and had some pitting on the shell but not all that much. They really are very neat and healthy turtles.
Have a Great Day!!!
200% agreed no toothbrush and yes they have a coat like a fish and is 100% normal;) However this one really seems infection

killerlexus
02-21-2009, 4:25 PM
get rid of all those cheap fishs or get another tank for the turtle. you dont want to keep $2 fish with your pricless turtle. that feed goldfish prob got ur turtle sick

Armand
02-23-2009, 2:24 PM
get rid of all those cheap fishs or get another tank for the turtle. you dont want to keep $2 fish with your pricless turtle. that feed goldfish prob got ur turtle sick


:iagree:

armac
02-23-2009, 2:58 PM
a shame to sicken a nice turtle with a BUNCH pf petsmart reject fish

elindra
02-26-2009, 8:44 AM
Looks like an infection and that gravel is not suitable for FRTs
There could be bacteria build-up in the gravel too.
I suggest you remove the gravel and replace it with soft & fine coral sand or river sand if you really must have substrate.

Meantime to treat the injuries and infections, you can clean the affected areas with a mild salt solution and apply Melafix directly on it.

Let the medication stay there for about 10 mins before putting your turtle back into the tank.

Meantime, pls ensure that your water is top quality to prevent the infections from getting worse.