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  1. #51
    Nice to meet you and welcome to MFK Red Devil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Hayward;2134999;
    If anyone can offer me some suggestions publicly or privately on stimulating Mobas to breed? My specimens are too damn beautiful to not be breeding and I feel guilty owning this beautiful WC fish and not lending back into the bloodlines in my area. Alpha male is anxious to get going, but the female he courts is not interested in anyway, even after taking them off food, and large cool waterchanges. I will be trying a drastic temporary change in diet (staple is NLS 3mm Cichlid), but am really hoping to hear from you with experience spawning Moba Frontosa.

    When I've asked this elsewhere, I get the same suggestions followed by "Yeah, and mobas tend to be one of the most difficult to breed really successfully. I'd settle for poor rates with some matings at all.
    Success at last - Breeding Cyphotilapia frontosa

    by Steve Thompson
    From the Cichlid Circular, New South Wales Cichlid Society, Australia, February 1988
    Aquarticles





    It took me almost eight years to get my first successful spawning of frontosa, but it was well worth waiting for. I've grown all my frontosa up from 1" fry and now my two oldest and original males are 14" long. I've read that Discus are the king of the aquarium, but when I see my two large males swimming so majestically through my tank, then to me they are the kings! Kings of the African cichlids anyway.

    I keep my Frontosas in a 6'x2'x20" tank and apart from my two large males I also have a young male of about 8" and three females which are between 6" and 7", two of which are the same age as the two large males, being almost 8 years old. Housed together with this colony is also a colony of Cyrtocara moorii (two males and four females), which breeds on a regular basis without interfering with the Frontosas. It has been written that Frontosa and C. moorii are each others counterparts in their respective lakes. But I just keep them together, because they have similar temperaments and also because they compliment each others beauty (or maybe I have a thing about fish with lumps on their heads).

    Their water is kept at 25ļC and a pH or 7.8. The fish are fed on Hikari pellets and flake food, Also about three times a week I feed them whole whitebait. These are small soft fish about 2" long, which can be bought at most fish co-operatives fairly cheaply. They are seasonal, so when they are available, I usually buy a couple of kilograms and freeze them in a thin block and just break off whatever I need to use. It is a much more natural food than beef heart, which I never use, and the Frontosa certainly relish them. In my opinion the food value of the beef heart isn't worth the risk of bloat.

    My Frontosa had spawned on four previous occasions, all unsuccessful, so this time, when I noticed a female starting to fill out and one of the males showing a bit more interest in her than usual, I decided to build a rock pile in the centre of my tank so as to form a type of barricade from the other fish and allow the pair of Frontosa a large open area at one end in which they could spawn. This worked perfectly, and they actually formed a pair bond and together kept the other fish at bay on the other side of the rock pile.

    It was two days later and about three hours after I did a partial water change that I noticed the female's breeding tube showing, and that evening over a period of about 1 hour she laid about 30 eggs and at no time did the male get aggressive with her, even when she had finished spawning. The whole spawning ritual seemed to happen in slow motion and there was none of the usual dashing about and tail wagging, which we've come to expect from mouth brooding cichlids.

    Later that night, I turned the lights off and left the room for about 30 minutes, returning with a net and an ice-cream container to catch the female and strip her of her eggs, because I didn't want her to eat the eggs again, as she had done on previous occasions.

    I first filled the ice-cream container with water and sat it on top of the tank. I then caught the female who was half asleep and didn't realise, what was happening. I opened her mouth and gently let the eggs tumble into the ice cream container. I then released the female back into the tank and turned off the lights again. I placed the eggs into a previously prepared tank, using the same water and set at the same temperature as the spawning tank, to be artificially incubated in the usual manner. I noticed, however, that one airstone was not enough to rotate these very large and heavy eggs. so I had to use another airstone. Unfortunately, Over half the eggs were infertile and had to be removed after two days, to prevent the pollution of the water. I think my male was a bit too casual about the whole affair. I did, however, manage to get 12 healthy fry fully developed after 28 days. SUCCESS AT LAST - after eight years!

    Even though it took me eight years to finally get a successful spawn, it was well worth the wait and gave me great satisfaction. So, anyone having difficulty breeding a certain species, hang in there! Don't give up! You will be well rewarded in the long run and nothing will give you more pleasure, than breeding a species which has been difficult for you.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Be yourself.... everyone else is taken:
    We donít measure by inches any more, We measure by feet!





  2. #52
    Cobra Snakehead Will Hayward's Avatar
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    Thanks Liz, I've read numerous articles detailing the same, but very few of them discuss what triggers breeding, and most of these articles even lack the specific locality of Frontosa that the authors are working with. I'm ready to print out these pages and tape them face down to my tank to show the fish what they should be doing.

    The fish I have are WC, and certainly dont need 8 years of growth and development like the authors. In fact I've been told that this colony has previous bred for its previous owners. I will be adding in some large females if I have the chance, and see if they take more of a fancy to the alpha male.




  3. #53
    I dum care =] Ash's Avatar
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    Some information on Hybrid Frontosas

    There are many types of Frontosa out there but when dealing with any hobby you always come across Hybrids. The photo below is a great example of a hybrid burundi frontosa.



    This is called mooning. It's when the the white comes down inside of the black stripe creating a half circle that looks like the "moon". It can also make the stripe look like its split. This is cuased by bad breeding/interbreeding and bad genes. Example someone breeds their fry with a parent, this can cause mooning. You always want a fresh gene pool when you breed to avoid something like mooning. Now keep in mind even though the parents may not show mooning, the fry still have the chance of showing the mooning.





    If you look at the adult male above, not only do you see mooning but you also see that by the tail, 2 stripes have combined but the top part of the stripe to the right did not quite connect all the way. In some cases that stripe may connect and you will see 7 stripes on one side and 6 on the other. This is something that is very common in a hybrid frontosa caused by bad breeding. If you notice the second picture of the juvie Frontosa- he shows signs of mooning.

    If you look at the photos below look at the 6 stripe fronts with mooning and then look at the 7 stripe front: She shows no mooning and has cleaner looking stripes.









    *These photos are of my own frontosa - I dont breed them so no worries*
    JOIN THE ]\/[OVEMENT
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  4. #54
    Nice to meet you and welcome to MFK Red Devil's Avatar
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    a few more varient types owned by Staszek

    WC Moba Imports --
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Be yourself.... everyone else is taken:
    We donít measure by inches any more, We measure by feet!



  5. #55
    Nice to meet you and welcome to MFK Red Devil's Avatar
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    owned by Staszek -

    Wc Mikula Male
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Be yourself.... everyone else is taken:
    We donít measure by inches any more, We measure by feet!



  6. #56
    Nice to meet you and welcome to MFK Red Devil's Avatar
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    owned by Staszek -

    African Driving Moba
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Be yourself.... everyone else is taken:
    We donít measure by inches any more, We measure by feet!



  7. #57
    Jardini cichlidgirl's Avatar
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    Frontosa variant dorsal fin color differences

    Hi guys. I have recently noticed something on my frontosa and gibberosa and I wanted to share it and ask other front keepers to chime in with their observations on their fish. Keep in mind when you read my description below that I am not referring to the intensity or quality of blue color but more about the inclusion of colors and hues other than a uniform blue.

    I noticed that my Frontosa (burundi) and gibberosa have a difference in coloring on their dorsal fins and only on the dorsal fins.

    My 7 Frontosa (burundi) , every one of them, in white light or sunlight all have a bright blue edge along the top of their dorsal fin. The rest of the dorsal fin is filled in with various shades of grey, greenish/gold or turquoise (often a mixure of all with the only solid pure blue running along the fin edge. Not a single one of them has a solid blue dorsal fin. I noticed when i run blue lights this can still be seen but is much less noticable.

    On the other hand i noticed that my Gibberosa (mpimbwe) , all 11 of them, have a completly solid blue dorsal fins. None of them have a visiable edging of brighter blue on their dorsal (at least not with the naked eye anyway) and none of them have any contrasting colors in their dorsals (other than a couple areas of black stripes that extend up a bit where they meet the dorsal)

    Is this also your experience ? If so are there any exceptions to this rule within the gibberosa variants ?

    Here are a couple pics that show this edging vs solid blue dorsals.

    My burundi with blue edge to dorsal and contrasting colors in the center of fin:




    In this group mixed shot you can clearly pick out the three burundi even in this poor quality pic, at a bad angle and shrunk in size, simply by looking at the blue edging on the dorsals.



    My Gibberosa (mpimbwe) with a solid uniformly blue dorsal :


    It seems to me that if this is a uniform difference seen accross the board that this would be a excellent trait to point out to new frontosa keepers to help them ID their fish and also would help hobbists new to fronts not get taken in by purposely mis labeled fish for sale online and at LFS.
    265 gallon Frontosa tank
    135 gallon mixed african community tank



  8. #58
    Jardini cichlidgirl's Avatar
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    Yep, a six footer is min. If you can find a reasonable priced 7 or even 8 footer and you have the room to safely place it in your home then you should do it. I have a six foot 135 and like it very much but it cant compare to the used 7 foot tank i recently got. I cant say enough good things about it. I figure it will really make a difference on aggression and breeding when my juvies mature into the big fronts that i know they will be. Every bit of extra space you can get is helpful at that point. Old fronts get quite large, well over 12 inches (in the 14-16 inch range) for the granddaddies. Can you imagine 6 to 8 12+ inch fish in a 125 or 135 ? Right now im looking at my 135 in the livingroom, it has two 12+ inch oscars in it and its FULL LOL. I cant imagine what 6 to 8 of those fish will look like. It would be way too crowded for them.
    265 gallon Frontosa tank
    135 gallon mixed african community tank



  9. #59
    Tigrinus Catfish Mysticshadows3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Devil;2054724;
    and lists the different varieties..
    1 Burundi
    2 Kigoma
    3 Kavala
    4 Karilani
    5 Mpimbwe
    6 Zaire
    7 Zambia

    ---------------

    I don't see a Zambia Front on here - would that be: Chaitika (Blue Sambia) and Kasanga)???

    Also, would Ikola and Kilipi be different kinds of Mpimbwe???

    And then would Congo (Cap Tembwe), Samazi, and Bulu point have no relation to the main 7 kinds of fronts????



  10. #60
    Tigrinus Catfish Mysticshadows3's Avatar
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    What's a Moba, where does that fit in???



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