Chinese hi fin banded loaches at Fish Story

CC N

Exodon
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Dec 17, 2021
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Ah, yes...good ol' Seriously Fish...

They list a maximum length of 900mm for this fish...right next to a pic of one that appears larger than that already but has still not even achieved the full adult body form. Most other sources indicate larger maximum sizes, some much larger.

Beyond that, SF tells us the adult fish weigh 40kg. That's almost 90 pounds, and is clearly impossible unless the fish is far, far longer than the measly maximum they ascribe to it.

Do these people even proofread the drivel they put out? They should change their name from Seriously Fish to just Seriously...?
Seriously Fish always messing up with length of larger fish... For example the Asian RTC. Those despite grows slowly but get HUGE !!!1641985178630.png
 

thebiggerthebetter

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CC N CC N I don't quite get your problem with SeriouslyFish. " Seriously Fish always messing up with length of larger fish " is a very strong, absolute, and condemning language! And uncalled for, IMHumbO. I beg to reconsider.

The ARTC entry you complain about states this: https://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/hemibagrus-wyckioides/ "Maximum Standard Length The largest bagrid species in central Indochina reaching at least 900-1000 mm and 70-80 kg in weight. The largest specimen known to date measured 1300 mm."

Now, 1300 mm may not be the absolute known record but it is 4 feet 4 inches, pretty much the fish that Jean-François is holding in his arms in your photo. Any larger specimen are very hard to come by nowadays, although perhaps not impossible.

Yes, as in the case with the Chinese Hi Fin sharks, again... a 70-80 kg fish would have to be far, far larger than 4ft, actually, should be around 6-7 feet, but again, the champion length and champion weight data likely come from different sources.

It is fish for the pond not for aquarium...They should be kept with his own kind in groups. If they are alone they are in big stress.
Ken tried, as he says. I was trying too. But so far I have only one remaining.

I think everyone agrees about them faring far better in ponds. Yet often it can be a death sentence too to place a 2"-3" hi fin in a pond due to tank mates, or natural predators, so they have to be grown out somewhere else.

... They, like any internet source...or, really, any source...are not completely reliable, and the cynic in me bubbled over a bit because they are quoted on such a constant basis that it might sound to some as though they are the final word, truth inviolate...
Thank you JJ, for this. One more thing comes to mind: you appear to fault SeriouslyFish for the indiscriminate, irrational ways some peers quote and treat their data. It is not the fault of the source, if people are gullible to the point of "believing" the data, instead of using their rationale and critical thinking and digestion and doing more homework and study on the topic/fish of their interest. It is not fair to fault the writer for the reader's intelligence that is found wanting...
 
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CC N

Exodon
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thebiggerthebetter thebiggerthebetter yeah you have convinced me to reconsidered. I think that the sources are from different sources come from and the web just collected them... but i hope some one from the site do some more research and check the info on the pages lol
 
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DrownedFishonFire

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So speciality cichlid food formulas would be better thats focused on the alage grazers? Just asking as i never tried to keep one but do see them often at the LFS. Just did not appeal to me when they lose that cute coloring they have when young. But is interesting species for sure to observe in other peoples setups.
 

thebiggerthebetter

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I am learning as well. I'd say yes because I presume our peers said above that the hi fins feed on the "microorganisms on algae" only when the hi fins are very young and small, and then they shift to the algae themselves. Both are suppositions of mine, because [1] I need to read up on this and [2] I gathered no clarity on these two finer points from the prior posts from our peers (which were appreciated still very much).

NLS pellets which we offer contain a good portion of algae:

... our favorite NLS tropical fish diet pellet. The main ingredients are the same for all non-specialist, general feeds, it seems.

4.85 lb for $60 retail ($36 wholesale) = $12.4/lb ($7.4/lb)

Krill (Euphasia superba), Squid (Dosidicus gigas), Whole wheat flour, Seaweed (Ulva lactuca, Undaria pinnatafida, Eucheuma cottonii, Eucheuma spinosum, Chondrus crispus), Fish (Brevoortia tyrannus), Green Algae (Chlorella pyrendoidosa), Kelp, Garlic, Ginger, Astaxanthin, Spirulina, Fish Oil, Marigold, Bentonite Clay, Sea Salt, Vitamin A acetate, Vit. D, Vit. E, Vit. B12, Niacin, Folic Acid, Biotin, Thiamine hydrochloride, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine hydrochloride, Calcium Pantothenate, Vit. C, Choline chloride, Ethylenediamine Dihydro-iodide, Cobalt Sulfate, Ferrous sulfate, Manganese sulfate, Tocopherols (a preservative).

Crude protein 37%, crude fat 8%, crude fiber 7%, moisture 10%.
Vit. C min. 600 IU/Kg, Vit. A min. 10000 IU/Kg, Vit. D min. 3500 IU/Kg, Vit. E min. 400 IU/Kg.

More on the ingredients from the Company: https://www.feedspectrum.com/learn
 
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