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    Highest temp for beneficial bacteria

    Discussion in 'Freshwater Diseases and Health Issues' started by Bigtdotcom, Sep 11, 2017.

    1. Bigtdotcom

      Bigtdotcom MFK Members

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      how high of a temperature can BB handle? I have a hydra infestation and I want to blast it with high heat of about 40 degrees Celsius. Will my bacteria survive these temps for a couple of hours? Fish will be removed during the process.
       
    2. tarheel96

      tarheel96 MFK Members

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      Nitrifying bacteria die at 120° F / 49° C). Optimal temperature is 86º F / 30º C). I not sure what would happen at 104º F / 40º C but I'd save some of the media in a plastic bag just in case.

      Have you heard of this method successfully ridding tanks of hydra before?
       
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    3. Bigtdotcom

      Bigtdotcom MFK Members

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      Yes I have read that 40degrees c should kill them. Will hydra be present on my filter media? I am about to up grade tanks and don't want to bring this pest with me
       
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    4. tarheel96

      tarheel96 MFK Members

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      One way they multiply is by releasing little buds that float away with the current so I believe there's a good chance they would be in the filter media. It depends on how much food they have. About how many would you say you have?
       
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    5. Drstrangelove

      Drstrangelove MFK Members

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      105 - 108F is what I read.

      The thing is, temps are variable inside a tank as well as inside the filter (where it's likely to be much cooler due to evaporation.)

      They are pretty nasty to have, so I wish you luck.




      https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/hydra-treatment.690563/#post-7784115
      I guess you had this before. Did the suggestions not work?
       
      #5 Drstrangelove, Sep 12, 2017
      Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
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    6. Charney

      Charney The Fish Doctor
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      i bet you will take a hit. watch water quality closely
      I used to live in apartment that would occasionally really heat up. I typically had a ammonia spike shortly afterwards
       
    7. tarheel96

      tarheel96 MFK Members

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      Yes. Flubendazole is effective against hydra and I prefer it to fenbendazole.

      "In fish [flubendazole] is used for controlling a number of organisms including hydra, hexamita, gill flukes, and callamanas ... dose levels are 0.5 grams of 10% flubendazole in 20 gallons (75 liters) of water ... it is reported to be safe at comparatively high levels."

      A review of flubenzadole and its potential as a macrofilariacide PDF
       
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    8. Bigtdotcom

      Bigtdotcom MFK Members

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      Thanks for the responses.

      How many do i have hahahahahaha like a million, not even a joke. If i clean the from glass they are noticeable in a week or 2. I have recently been dealing with an internal parasite and think i am finally in the clear thanks to parzipro, the tank that is infected with hydra is my 55gal american tank. My americans are about to be upgraded to a 125gal and i dont want to bring the hydra with me.
      While dealing with an internal parasite I tried Kusuri wormer plus which is flubenzadole (50mg/g flubenzadole) I was dosing as per the instruction 1 scoop (0.3g) per 30gal. i used 2 scoops for 55 gal. Kusuri wormer had no effect on my internal parasite and hydra still remains, dosed at least 5 times. Now using parzipro internal parasite seems to have cleared up.

      Some where along the way i picked up some genchem No-planaria which is also said to kill hydra. I dosed my tank once with this stuff and it had no effect on the hydra....main ingredient is betel nut palm extract. I found about 2 days after i added this stuff my ghost knife started swimming around in circles and acting crazy. I removed him to a hospital tank and now he is perfectly fine. Not sure if he had a reaction to the no-planaria or if maybe there was still some flubenzadole in the tank and the combo did not agree with him????

      I also have a 40 gal clown loach tank with fluval 306filter.

      would it be best if i.....

      -Move american to new tank with 100% new water and take half the bio media from my fluval 306 to seed new filter in new tank. Then dry out all old media, driftwood ect from 55gal and add to new tank in a few weeks time.

      - Move BGK to hospital tank again to be safe and try no-planraia on 55gal and see what happens.

      Im i move my american along with media from clown loach tank i could turn my temp up to 40 and see what happens??? could just add food each day and monitor if ammonia is converted to nitrate.
       
    9. Bigtdotcom

      Bigtdotcom MFK Members

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      https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/hydra-treatment.690563/#post-7784115
      I guess you had this before. Did the suggestions not work?[/QUOTE]

      I forget about that post. sorry to double up. As mentioned in the other post fenbenzadole is pretty hard to come by and expensive to get here in australia. Flubenzadole is not seeming to work unless i have the dosage wrong??

      I added some mollies to my tank which are said to eat hydra they are eating it but i cant see then clearing the whole tank.

      The more i think about it i think the best option is to take half the media from my clown loach tank and hope its enough to get my new tank kickstarted and dosent effect the CL tank.
       
    10. tarheel96

      tarheel96 MFK Members

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      Well ... the dose on the kusuri instructions is nearly 5 lower than what's recommended to kill hydra from that study I linked to which states:

      "dose levels are 0.5 grams of 10% flubendazole in 20 gallons (75 liters) of water"

      0.5 grams 10% flubendazole per 20 gallons (75 liters)
      500 mg / 75 L =
      6.67 mg/L 10% flubendazole =
      0.67 mg/L flubendazole

      Kusuri is 50 mg/g (5%) flubenzadole and the directions say 1 scoop (0.3g) per 30 gal. You used 2 scoops for 55 gallons so,

      0.6 grams 5% flubendazole per 55 gallons (208 liters)
      600 mg / 208 L =
      2.88 mg/L 5% flubendazole =
      0.14 mg/L flubendazole

      0.14 ppm compared to 0.64 ppm? The numbers are so different maybe my math is wrong.
      @Drstrangelove@Drstrangelove @Grinch@Grinch

      At that dose, did the flubendazole kill nematodes or anything else you were using it for? The scoop is very small right? ... close to 1/16th or 1/32nd teaspoon?
       
      #10 tarheel96, Sep 14, 2017 at 10:11 PM
      Last edited: Sep 14, 2017 at 10:17 PM
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