How long can a trickle filter lasts until it dry out?

Death03

Jack Dempsey
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Hi guys, so I've been thinking of additional bio filtration to my tanks and one of the very cost effective filters I see online is the trickle filter. But the problem I have is sometimes in our area there could be power outages that could last for hours and sometimes even for a day.

Typically how long does it take to dry out an entire trickle filter? If it usually take just a few hours then I might lean towards the canisters.
 
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tlindsey

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Hi guys, so I've been thinking of additional bio filtration to my tanks and one of the very cost effective filters I see online is the trickle filter. But the problem I have is sometimes in our area there could be power outages that could last for hours and sometimes even for a day.

Typically how long does it take to dry out an entire trickle filter? If it usually take just a few hours then I might lean towards the canisters.

It depends on how dry or humid the room is. I suggest a sump with submerged bio media since you have power outages that last hours.
 

Death03

Jack Dempsey
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It depends on how dry or humid the room is. I suggest a sump with submerged bio media since you have power outages that last hours.
Yeah, I figured that would be the case. I just wanted to make sure since the trickle filter costs like half the price of canister or building a sump since I won't really need to purchase a pump since I can just use a powerhead. Anyway thank for your help again!
 

Death03

Jack Dempsey
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With bio cubes /plastic media - about a week.

With sponge or gravel media - about 6 weeks.

Wet /dry media also produces complex biofilm colonies so they are quick to recover even when dried out.
Really? It's some kind of a modified overhead sump and it's very popular here in our country since it's really cheaper than building a sump or a canister. And you would only need a powerhead to make this one running and I already have quite a few laying around.

This is what the trickle filter would look like:

trickle-filter.jpg

Hmm would I be able to get away with this setup?
 
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esoxlucius

Redtail Catfish
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With bio cubes /plastic media - about a week.

With sponge or gravel media - about 6 weeks.

Wet /dry media also produces complex biofilm colonies so they are quick to recover even when dried out.
Interesting, do you have a link to that information? I'm struggling to understand how a piece of dried out sponge/gravel media lasts six times longer than plastic/bio cube media when both dried out. What's magic about the former as opposed to the latter?

I do know that BB have a membrane that can protect against short periods of drying out but I haven't actually read any info on a definitive timescale before they die completely. Also, if left dried out you may very well have some survivors that can re-establish themselves. But it would take time to get back up to speed, during which time your tank would crash.

But I know of a man who should be able to help us duanes duanes .
 
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fishdance

Piranha
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The most reliable verification method for non believers is quite simple. Put a section of your bio filtration aside for a few weeks and periodicly check for dampness. A tissue would do. I mean a comparative representation, not spreading the media out on a plastic sheet to dry out.

A bucket of drained gravel will stay moist for many many months. (Try it)

You can keep your main filter running while you do this.
 

fishdance

Piranha
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Yes I am very familiar with your overhead filter. Very efficient but it can be further boosted by having it slow fill then sudden dump cyclicly down to the next layer and next later. Having it fill with water allows you to submerge 100% of media so maximizing efficiency without channeling. And water fill pushes all the old air out from between particles so you know fresh air is exchanged each flush. As a side benefit the fish love the sudden water dumps (wave filter) which stirs the bottom better than a constant flow. Aeration would be fairly similar but very tall traditional drip filters can be low on oxygen by the time the water returns to tank. (Unlike a flushing filter).

Recommend you keep bio filter in dark to reduce algae growth which will clog.
 

twentyleagues

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If there is a lid to prevent evaporation then it could last hours or days even. Put a layer of mechanical filtration on top of biomedia will further add to the ability to stay moist.
 
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