obtaining a permit to keep restricted species!

jonah h2o

Candiru
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Aug 2, 2016
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how to apply for permit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=28869&inline

- fee information https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Licensing/Restricted-Species

if anyone has a fish thats on the list that they just can't live without this will tell you how to apply for a permit and what is required if you keep the fish, heres are the basic things it says:

1. 113$ renewal and a 58$ amendment
2. inspection fees are based on number of enclosures 1-5 enclosures is a 234$ inspection fee and so on
3. enclosures (tanks) must be inspected 2x every year
4. Permits expire one year from the date that the permit is issued.

hope this helps and if their is already another thread on this sorry. maybe it will provide updated info?
 

Yuki Rihwa

Redtail Catfish
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Jan 22, 2015
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Asian aro isn't restricted.. It's banned.. Only way to get one is being a researcher or public aquarium, those permits cost more than most regular fish keepers could afford
One of the LFS near me got a 2 foots long Red Tail Golden Arowana swimming in 8x3x3 foot tank and marked NOT FOR SALE, I don't know how these permit work :)
 

Fat Homer

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how to apply for permit https://nrm.dfg.ca.gov/FileHandler.ashx?DocumentID=28869&inline

- fee information https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Licensing/Restricted-Species

if anyone has a fish thats on the list that they just can't live without this will tell you how to apply for a permit and what is required if you keep the fish, heres are the basic things it says:

1. 113$ renewal and a 58$ amendment
2. inspection fees are based on number of enclosures 1-5 enclosures is a 234$ inspection fee and so on
3. enclosures (tanks) must be inspected 2x every year
4. Permits expire one year from the date that the permit is issued.

hope this helps and if their is already another thread on this sorry. maybe it will provide updated info?
Did you by any chance read through all the requirements??? The reason i ask is, just cause the permit fee might not be overly expensive, the requirements are CRAZY...

1 - You basically MUST have a closed circuit system, meaning no parasites / pathogens etc can get out your tank into the wild...

2 - They will do site visits at least twice a year (that you pay for)...

3 - you need to provide a written plan of what you will do if the fish somehow gets put of your tank into the wild etc...

Pretty sure people in the past have asked and thought about this, but the end consensus was basically that it will always be more hassle than it was worth, and chances you still wont get the permit...

Although i think Oddball Oddball did get one of these before for his facility if im not mistaken???
 

kendragon

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Fat Homer you are totally correct...more hassle than what its worth. Years ago I looked into a permit for a UV manufacturer. At the time, we were doing research on freshwater stingrays. After speaking with dfg they basically said it will never get approved. Definitely won't get approved for a hobbyist.
 

Fat Homer

Mmmmm... Doughnuts
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One of the LFS near me got a 2 foots long Red Tail Golden Arowana swimming in 8x3x3 foot tank and marked NOT FOR SALE, I don't know how these permit work :)
If you live in Asia like myself, then chances are you can legally import chipped & certified Asian Arowana from breeding farms...
 

jonah h2o

Candiru
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Aug 2, 2016
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san diego California
it doesn't seem to awful, but again I said if its a fish that you can't live without or have to have. I bet people would go through it to keep rays. some of the restrictions are ridiculous
though. I don't get how rays could possibly be invasive, they're sensitive. what sucks is that the water really doesn't get warm enough for many of those fish to live long term and cause a problem.
 

Fat Homer

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it doesn't seem to awful, but again I said if its a fish that you can't live without or have to have. I bet people would go through it to keep rays. some of the restrictions are ridiculous
though. I don't get how rays could possibly be invasive, they're sensitive. what sucks is that the water really doesn't get warm enough for many of those fish to live long term and cause a problem.
^ just the closed circuit system will kill any regular hobbyists chances, coz that means when doing a water change etc, you must guarantee NO parasites / pathogens from the tank containing said fish can get out into public waterways... so no direct draining tank into drains or gardens etc...

And unless you can prove to the AFD that your system is 100% capable of doing that, then chances are its still a no go for the permit...
 

M@T!@$

Aimara
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Feb 23, 2016
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it doesn't seem to awful, but again I said if its a fish that you can't live without or have to have. I bet people would go through it to keep rays. some of the restrictions are ridiculous
though. I don't get how rays could possibly be invasive, they're sensitive. what sucks is that the water really doesn't get warm enough for many of those fish to live long term and cause a problem.
Learned this in science... If you introduce a non native species to a new water system, there may be no natural predators, hence they over populate and become invasive.
 
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