OOPS!!! Not Fish. Just Dinosaur Eggs.

Oddball

Administrator
Original poster
Staff member
Administrator
MFK Member
Apr 27, 2005
22,380
2,519
9,480
61
Bama
I thought I was removing another box containing fossil fish (to add to the thread). Instead I found several of my dinosaur egg specimens. I figured someone might like to see them. So, here you go:

This first piece is an egg shard from a Titanosauridae. It's from the Cretaceous period of Argentina. The second piece is a free-form polished cabochon, I ground from the same material, to display the pores the dinosaur embryo used for respiration.

eggcabrough.jpg

eggcab.jpg

titanosaurpic.jpg
 

Oddball

Administrator
Original poster
Staff member
Administrator
MFK Member
Apr 27, 2005
22,380
2,519
9,480
61
Bama
Next is a "crushed in the nest" egg of a dinosaur called Saltosaurus from the Cretaceous Formation, Allen Location, Patagonia, Argentina. It's thought the crushing occurred after the eggs hatched when the migrating dinosaurs, and their young, left for better seasonal grazing grounds. The nests would have been ignored, after the eggs all hatched, and were trampled as the herd moved off the nesting grounds.

saltosaurus.jpg

saltosaurus cu.jpg

saltosauruspic.jpg
 

Oddball

Administrator
Original poster
Staff member
Administrator
MFK Member
Apr 27, 2005
22,380
2,519
9,480
61
Bama
From another part of the globe, is a partial nest containing 2 melon-size eggs of a Hadrosaurid dinosaur. These are from the Late Cretaceous period of the Xixia Basin, Henan Province, China.

hadrosaurid china.jpg

hadrosaurid china cu.jpg

hadrosaurus.jpg
 

Oddball

Administrator
Original poster
Staff member
Administrator
MFK Member
Apr 27, 2005
22,380
2,519
9,480
61
Bama
This is one of my favorite finds. This egg belonged to the Utahraptor of the Lower Cretaceous of Wyoming. It's hard enough to find a dinosaur egg piece, much less an egg from a predator. The territorial imperative calls for 100 prey animals needed to support a major predator. That means there will always be less predator material to be found than prey material.
Utahraptor is the pack hunting dinosaur featured in Jurassic Park movies. Now, before you all start pointing out that this dino is from the cretaceous instead of the jurassic, here's a tidbit for you. The books and movies were called Jurassic Park because the name Jurassic presented better than the word Cretaceous. The dinosaurs in the movie were, in fact, from the Cretaceous period. Jurassic dinosaurs were smaller (Albertosaurs were 28ft precursors to the 40ft T-Rex) than the true monsters of the Cretaceous period.

utahraptor wyomingensis.jpg

utahraptor wyomingensis cu.jpg

utahraptorpic.jpg
 

Oddball

Administrator
Original poster
Staff member
Administrator
MFK Member
Apr 27, 2005
22,380
2,519
9,480
61
Bama
joeytoe;531019; said:
No t-rex egg Oddball?
As far as I know, there have only been 2 incomplete T-Rex eggs ever identified. IF I had one, I'd probably have it confiscated as a national treasure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: J. H.
zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store