Something I’ve noticed.

fishhead0103666

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(If you’re too lazy to read just skip down to the bottom)

I used to have problems with my silver dollars while doing water changes and nothing ever seemed to work.
I would use my python to take water out and they would be ok but it would only be about mid way through filling the tank back up that my silver dollars would begin to breathe heavy so something was wrong. I believe it was because I do 70-80% water changes along with the fact that I added the prime after all the new water was in that they had problems.
Eventually I got a Rubbermaid trash can and started mixing my water in there then pumping it into the tank. (Thanks Go_redfish Go_redfish for the advice on what pump to get).
Somewhere between realizing something was wrong and getting the trash can I added a strong air pump I had, this will be important later.
Anyway I started emptying the water with my python, filling the trash can, treating the water, then pumping it into the tank. It went well except the silver dollars kept breathing heavy so I began to experiment. Eventually I left the pump running in the trash can letting it circulate the water before I pumped it into the tank and they stopped breathing hard. The water that I was putting into the tank hadn’t been full dechlorinated yet, only partially and the circulating it before pumping it into the tank fixed it.
I thought everything was perfect now. Nope.
I removed my strong air pump and put it on another tank then during my next water change with the silver dollars they began swimming downwards against the glass and just freaking the hell out about 3 times as worse than before.
They no longer were swimming in straight tap water while I waited for the tank to fill up completely before treating it so what was the issue? The issue was the lack of an air pump. As soon as I added another air pump they were perfectly fine the next water change.

Anyone else have this happened to them before?
I read a story on this site about this guy having his bala sharks die because his air pump cut off during a water change so I believe silver dollars are the same but just less sensitive.

Now for those who were too lazy to read here is the short version.
Through my experience with silver dollars I find that they do best (dare I say need?) with an air pump running while in the midst of water changes.
 

Go_redfish

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Gotta do what you feel works best for your fish. Glad they seem to be more comfortable.
 

Kittiee Katt

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I don't have this issue but that could be because of how quick I am with everything. There's only about 40 seconds between when the tank stops draining and starts filling (prime dosed before hose goes on) and I angle the hose along the waters surface to create agitation while its filling because I heard too much prime can deplete the DO in the water.

Maybe I've just been lucky but this is how I do all my tanks and has been for a few years now, pretty much since I joined mfk. With the exception of QT/hospital tanks, and tanks with old fish. With those I temp match so the tanks are emptied with a hose and filled with buckets.


My ex (who is currently looking after all of our fish) does the exact same thing. We've had no problems so far. :)
 

fishhead0103666

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What size tank do you have though?
 

Kittiee Katt

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What size tank do you have though?
5' 400ltr so not the biggest. Fish consist of dollars (one of whom is my oldest fish at over 8yrs), assorted SA tetras and stray corydoras. :)
 

fishhead0103666

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Ok my argument is invalid since your tank is bigger than mine. Wait, how much water do you change roughly?
 

Kittiee Katt

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Ok my argument is invalid since your tank is bigger than mine. Wait, how much water do you change roughly?
Almost fin level changes, about an inch above the larger dollars dorsal fin.

Drain tank (syphoning poop/cleaning filters while it does), add prime, fill tank with cold water from hose. Thats it and I've been fine. :)

Edit: I also test the nitrate and pH prior to WC's and about an hour or so after. :)
 
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duanes

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How is your tap water treated at the source? Do you live close to the source (high chlorine) or far from the source ( low chlorine)
Does the provider use straight Chlorine, or Choramine (Total chlorine) and what is the average residual.
You can usually find this info out on your water bill, or on the water providers web site.
Some water providers need to use a high dose to protect human health, in this case you may need a larger amount of dechlorinator. Sometimes a high does only certain times of year.
Some water providers need to only use very little, in this case you may need to use less declorinator.
If your water provider uses simple chorine, the aeration will help.
If chloramine aeration does very little, because the dose is so stable.
If you live in a cold climate, your water may be super saturated with gases under pressure in the pipes, this can cause stress to fish. If you draw a glass of water, and it appears cloudy but clears from the bottom up, dissolved gases are present.
If you live in a cold climate you may need to use some hot water mixed with cold to match temps. I always had to do this in Wisconsin, water came out of the tap in the high 30sF, and super saturated with gas.
If you need to mix hot with cold, a few times per years you need to drain some of the water out the low tap of your water heater (all water heaters need this at least once per year).
Viscous minerals can build up (precipitate due to drastic temp fluctuations) and be stressful to fish. I would drain a few gallons on my water heater 2 to 3 times per year, until the water didn't feel viscous.
 

fishhead0103666

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I barely understood any of that because of the quantity of information thrown at me at once.
I know I can understand it so I’ll take another look at what you said when I get home and I’ll check what you said to check.
Also thanks for your input duanes, I dont know why I didn’t think to mention this to you before since you’re so knowledgeable about stuff like this since you’re... either a chemist or a microbiologist?
 
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MrsE88

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How is your tap water treated at the source? Do you live close to the source (high chlorine) or far from the source ( low chlorine)
Does the provider use straight Chlorine, or Choramine (Total chlorine) and what is the average residual.
You can usually find this info out on your water bill, or on the water providers web site.
Some water providers need to use a high dose to protect human health, in this case you may need a larger amount of dechlorinator. Sometimes a high does only certain times of year.
Some water providers need to only use very little, in this case you may need to use less declorinator.
If your water provider uses simple chorine, the aeration will help.
If chloramine aeration does very little, because the dose is so stable.
If you live in a cold climate, your water may be super saturated with gases under pressure in the pipes, this can cause stress to fish. If you draw a glass of water, and it appears cloudy but clears from the bottom up, dissolved gases are present.
If you live in a cold climate you may need to use some hot water mixed with cold to match temps. I always had to do this in Wisconsin, water came out of the tap in the high 30sF, and super saturated with gas.
If you need to mix hot with cold, a few times per years you need to drain some of the water out the low tap of your water heater (all water heaters need this at least once per year).
Viscous minerals can build up (precipitate due to drastic temp fluctuations) and be stressful to fish. I would drain a few gallons on my water heater 2 to 3 times per year, until the water didn't feel viscous.
I’m glad you mentioned drainage some water from the water heater. I never remember to do this:( I gotta get on that.
 
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