Display quality fiberglass monster tanks/ponds

Ponddaddy

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Dec 28, 2019
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Man, it's 43 degrees in Melbourne at the moment. If I had a refrigerated trout tank I would be in my jocks sitting in it!
Christ that’s hot ! We’re lucky to see 40oC up here. Everywhere’s copping somthing at the moment. But if you want a rainbow trout aquarium I know a guy that builds them haha.
 

Galantspeedz

Redtail Catfish
MFK Member
Feb 28, 2017
1,965
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you have to ask your aussie fish friends how much they will pay.... asking rest of the world is moot....

but if it helps, i paid $400 for a 2nd hand 5x3x2 ft fibreglass tank and 5x1x1 fibreglass overhead filter delivered to me. And for a custom build 8x4x2 ft pond with glass on 2 sides with internal flow sump. It will be $6000. both in your currency
 
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fishdance

Polypterus
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2007
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Not trying to discourage you as all new aquarium enterprises are good for the industry but I think you will have some challenges ahead. With the improvements in glass and acrylic manufacture, adhesives and international transportation, bigger tanks are not as difficult to obtain as they used to be. A 12 foot long x 4 foot wide x 2 foot high all glass tank can be locally purchased under $2K and isn't really considered a large tank for the demographic you seek.

Sheet metal panel bolt together water tanks are available in 1 meter square increments as long, wide or tall as needed. Already meeting Australian structural standards. For an aquarium, industrial grade epoxy coatings with the steel framing going on the outside.

For in between or specific custom dimensions, HDPE sheets screwed to a steel frame and plastic welded seams are getting popular. All screws are covered over in HDPE.

AND mainland China is producing fantastic glass and acrylic tanks. A fully made tank is only limited by container size (12m). Their labour and factory costs can't be beaten. And even cheaper if ordered by sheets. I brought in 16 foot x 4 foot x 4 foot 19mm toughened glass SGP laminate (40mm) glass sheets which were so cheap, the freight was the most expensive component. And I'm talking about the freight from local port to my house, not the international shipping cost.

To get around your third party warranty issue, you could a) sell without warranty, b) personally fly out and install each (which I'd recommend if you want to maintain quality control and word of mouth service as a start up company or c) use a trained up reseller in each capital city.

Also, rather than installing chillers or UV or solar light tubes, look into chemically removed nitrates so water changes are significantly reduced /eliminated. Contact Mike Hanrahan of AustMarine seafood tanks. There may be more recent technology developments.

Good luck.
 

Ponddaddy

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Dec 28, 2019
7
1
3
26
Not trying to discourage you as all new aquarium enterprises are good for the industry but I think you will have some challenges ahead. With the improvements in glass and acrylic manufacture, adhesives and international transportation, bigger tanks are not as difficult to obtain as they used to be. A 12 foot long x 4 foot wide x 2 foot high all glass tank can be locally purchased under $2K and isn't really considered a large tank for the demographic you seek.

Sheet metal panel bolt together water tanks are available in 1 meter square increments as long, wide or tall as needed. Already meeting Australian structural standards. For an aquarium, industrial grade epoxy coatings with the steel framing going on the outside.

For in between or specific custom dimensions, HDPE sheets screwed to a steel frame and plastic welded seams are getting popular. All screws are covered over in HDPE.

AND mainland China is producing fantastic glass and acrylic tanks. A fully made tank is only limited by container size (12m). Their labour and factory costs can't be beaten. And even cheaper if ordered by sheets. I brought in 16 foot x 4 foot x 4 foot 19mm toughened glass SGP laminate (40mm) glass sheets which were so cheap, the freight was the most expensive component. And I'm talking about the freight from local port to my house, not the international shipping cost.

To get around your third party warranty issue, you could a) sell without warranty, b) personally fly out and install each (which I'd recommend if you want to maintain quality control and word of mouth service as a start up company or c) use a trained up reseller in each capital city.

Also, rather than installing chillers or UV or solar light tubes, look into chemically removed nitrates so water changes are significantly reduced /eliminated. Contact Mike Hanrahan of AustMarine seafood tanks. There may be more recent technology developments.

Good luck.
Please don’t fret about discouraging me as long as your arguments come from a common sense standpoint I’m all ears!. All new business have hurdles and challenges in their lifetimes I’m expecting some big ones.

When people compare tanks there is so much to take into account. You may pay $2000 for a tank delivered but still have the other 70% of the tank to set up. Another is if people are looking for cheap tanks I don’t really want any part in those sales. Your example being glass or acrylic for $2000 I have been quoted similar numbers just for viewing panels on some models.

In my opinion the only positives to a full glass sheet aquarium is viewing capabilities and transparentcy. We’re as a Fiberglass tank with a singular viewing face has superior energy efficiency, consistency in temperature and very little risk of material failure. Not to mention custom shapes and sizes become much easier with stronger construction across the board.

As for bolt together aquaculture tanks and others of the sort are the ugliest things I have ever laid eyes on.... why spend thousands and thousands in livestock and equipment to look at a blue plastic or raw structure. Where as my designs will fit right in as a Center piece to a architecturally designed home.

As for warranty in Australia we have minimum requirements that have to be upheld no matter the written warranty given with the product. So for me to uphold those minimum requirements it’s very hard to give any third party control of installation. I’m leaning towards overseeing any installation over a certain size and anything under that will be covered under manufacturers warranty.

The components you mentioned are all for very different applications in my designs. Solar is specifically a stage two energy supply. Chillers where geographically required to maintain temps or for certain livestock. I would steer clear of UV sterilisation unless the application required. I’m not a massive fan of chemically removing nitrates but then again I know very little on the subject. Very well worth a look into. I would love to supply a natural alternative to buffer nitrates as a kit but my ideas throw quality control of water out the window for most. I will look into that contact though thankyou.
 

esoxlucius

Redtail Catfish
MFK Member
Dec 30, 2015
1,578
2,603
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UK
I love my 360g fibreglass tank. It cost about £650 (uk). An all glass tank would have been murder to install due to the weight and an all acrylic tank was silly money, that's why I went fibreglass. It took just me and my 14 year old lad to shift it into place, though it was cumbersome.

The big downside with fibreglass tanks, and it's twofold in a lot of people's eyes, is that usually there's only one viewing window and a lot of them are ugly rough things (and yes, those blue ones are hideous, mines black outside and in). Many people wouldn't dream of having them as a centrepiece in their living room. A shed, or a garage or other dedicated fish room where aesthetics aren't that important is usually a good place for current fibreglass tanks. Mine is in my fish room where not many people go, my 180g all glass tank is the showpiece tank in my living room.

I built a stand for my fibreglass tank whereas many would leave them on the floor. So my single viewing panel is at a good height for seeing the fish (all midwater, top level fish by the way, how rays or other bottom dwellers can be enjoyed in a fibreglass tank is another problem).

I believe the secret to moving fibreglass tanks forward is to have more viewing panels, maybe three in total, and deeper ones at that so bottom dwellers can be seen, and to make them easier on the eye so people would start to look at them as proper display tanks which could rival their stupidly heavy glass or insanely expensive acrylic counterparts.

Maybe the price would have to increase with more glass panels and the weight of the tanks would go up a bit but at the end of the day I think it's possible for someone like you, who's obviously passionate about this, to come up with a relatively lightweight and cheap fibreglass tank that you can see your fish in, from not just a single viewpoint. And the biggest plus for many people is that your design would look the part.

Then you'd have to go about designing, testing, producing, marketing and shipping them to the world, no small problem.
 
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