Faders - explained

RD.

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If it were true amelanism they would be born without melanin(black pigment). They would also have red pupils.
Not neccessarily with fish, or other non mammal species.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amelanism

Amelanism in other vertebrates
Other vertebrates, such as fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds, produce a variety of non-melanin pigments. Disruption of melanin production does not affect the production of these pigments. Non-melanin pigments in other vertebrates are produced by cells called chromatophores. Within this categorization, xanthophores are cells that contain primarily yellowish pteridines, while erythrophores contain primarily orangish carotenoids. Some species also possess iridophores or leucophores, which do not contain true pigments, but light-reflective structures that give iridescence. An extremely uncommon type of chromatophore, the cyanophore, produces a very vivid blue pigment.[4] Amelanism in fishes, amphibians, reptiles and birds has the same genetic etiology as in mammals: loss of tyrosinase function. However, due to the presence of other pigments, other amelanistic vertebrates are seldom white and red-eyed like amelanistic mammals.
Lots of sources for you to check out at the bottom of that page.


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RD.

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Is it possible its actually xanthism?
No, it's not possible.

Xanthic fish are predominantly yellow colored morphs, due to the excessive production and distribution of yellow pigments in the fish.
 

jakeca77

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Do fish that are mostly white with orange and black spotting at an early age often turn almost all white as they age or do they sometimes get more of the orange and black? I'm just asking because I don't have much experience with fading cichlids but I have noticed that in goldfish and carp that the fish often got to almost completely white over time.

So basically, do flowerhorns/faders that are almost all white sometimes get color in those white spots?
 

RD.

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It can go either way, no telling until the fish matures, or at least begins to mature. I've seen fish that are mostly white or faded yellow turn an intense solid orange/red as they mature.
 

FishFreak95

Jack Dempsey
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Is the fading gene in Red Texas, Amphilophis, and Flowerhorns all the same? Also, is it a recessive gene?
 

RD.

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