Feeding the proper amount.

Randys

Plecostomus
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Nov 3, 2015
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What is the precise way to determine how much to fed your fish?

Is it determined by the weight of the fish? If so, what’s the ratio? And how can you estimate the weight of the fish?
I’ve noticed on some aquarium tv shows they actually remove the larger animals and weight them when they need to be target fed.

Ive got a new flower horn in a 90 gallon by himself and I’d like to be more accurate on the amount of food he gets.
 

RD.

Crazy Canuck
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IMO feeding fish is part art, part science. As far as how much, the easiest method for the average fish keeper is let your eyes be your guide. If the fish is looking skinny, feed more, if the fish is looking obese, cut back & feed less. This will vary among species, even among fish within the same species, regardless of overall weight, due to the energy expended by the fish in a glass box. So in order to properly meet those energy requirements, and depending on how nutrient dense your food is, or isn't, can cause WIDE variations in what each fish requires for optimum or ideal growth. Commercial vendors clearly have different goals than someone raising a pet fish in a 90 gallon.

Do not feed to satiation as most fish are hard wired to overfeed. (feast/famine)
 
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Randys

Plecostomus
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Traverse City, Michigan
Yup, I have more of a tendency to under feed as opposed to over feed. I usually just put enough in that’s gone in a couple of minutes. I was just wondering if there’s a more scientific way to approach this as a starting baseline.
 

RD.

Crazy Canuck
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7 years I believe, and approx 11”. I fed him exactly as I described, as I have with all my fish over the years.
 

RD.

Crazy Canuck
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Yup, I have more of a tendency to under feed as opposed to over feed. I usually just put enough in that’s gone in a couple of minutes. I was just wondering if there’s a more scientific way to approach this as a starting baseline.

Lots of science regarding commercial aquaculture out there in google land, but growth is largely determined by quantity and quality of feed. It’s not like most hobbyists are going to measure and weigh their fish each week. IMO a good eye ball is the best method for monitoring the overall health and growth of pet fish. A hungry fish is a healthy fish.
 

esoxlucius

Redtail Catfish
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One thing is for sure, you can't let your fish influence your feeding. If it was down to them they'd beg all day and eat everything you threw in. As RD said, feast or famine. That would be no good for them, no good for your tank, and no good for your wallet!

Feed sparingly, keep them hungry and throw a fasting day into the mix. Your fishes appearance over a period of time will tell you if you've got a good balance.
 
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neutrino

Aimara
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Jan 22, 2013
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IMO feeding fish is part art, part science. As far as how much, the easiest method for the average fish keeper is let your eyes be your guide. If the fish is looking skinny, feed more, if the fish is looking obese, cut back & feed less. This will vary among species, even among fish within the same species, regardless of overall weight, due to the energy expended by the fish in a glass box. So in order to properly meet those energy requirements, and depending on how nutrient dense your food is, or isn't, can cause WIDE variations in what each fish requires for optimum or ideal growth. Commercial vendors clearly have different goals than someone raising a pet fish in a 90 gallon.

Do not feed to satiation as most fish are hard wired to overfeed. (feast/famine)
Exactly what I do. Couldn't have said it better.

Different species may need different amounts of food at any given size, and in many species the same fish will go through different growth cycles and stages and food needs will also change accordingly. X weight of fish = X amount of food is okay for the term of a science feed trial, but it's not the best approach long term.
 
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