Moving to a warmer climate, new pond, continuous water change and questions!

Jonathan Robinson

Feeder Fish
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Nov 2, 2016
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Hi all,

Been away from the forum for a while, but we are moving from Scotland (near Edinburgh) to Devon (south west England) in July and I'll be building a new pond at the new house.

The climate is much warmer there (5-6 celsius warmer in summer, 3-4c warmer in winter) and I'll be building an above ground (prebuilt at my workshop) timber walled pond 15x8x4ft with about 12000 litres volume. I will be taking around 10 3 year old carp (C3s, as they are known) and growing them on for a couple of years before rehoming them and starting again. I love carp, not koi, and love growing them on.

The farm where we will be living has an unlimited supply of free (drinking quality) spring water on tap, which I plan to utilise as a continuous water change, dripping in and overflowing out. The water (I am led to believe), comes out at a steady 10-12c which means over winter it would artificially elevate the water temperature in the pond, but cool it in summer. To counteract the summer cooling, I can build a simple solar water heater for about £150 which should bring the inflowing water up to at least the same as the pond temperature (23c, I'm hoping as the pond will be under cover, under a clear roof).

I'll install wavemaker type pumps to circulate the water (some very high output models on eBay for not much money, with a low wattage draw) and aeration too.

The carp will be put in at approximately 8lb weight, and I'd expect them to reach 20lb within 2 years.

With all of the above information, does anyone have an idea of what kind of drip rate I should be employing for the water change? I am thinking 50 litres an hour, which would equate to 10% per day. I would like to avoid the need to install filtration, hoping that the continuous change of water will provide a healthy and stable environment for the fish.

Also, if anyone spots any glaring issues with the above plan, please do say! I've kept fish for years and years, and have a pond presently, but this is a new concept for me. I love the idea of the continuous change as it vastly reduces the workload for maintenance as well as providing steady water parameters.

I'm not growing the carp on for financial gain, rather as a hobby and a challenge. The pond will have an acrylic window built into the front, so that I can enjoy watching them side on too.

Also, does the stocking plan sound reasonable? 10 fish in a 12,000 litre pond that isn't a closed system seems OK to me, but I'm happy to be told I'm wrong if I am!
 

Jonathan Robinson

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Nov 2, 2016
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This forum is bloody useless. Nearly a week this topic has been up and no one has replied. Lots of different questions and I was looking for advice, but what's the point if no one can be bothered to respond? This isn't the first time I've experienced this here either.

Most frustrating! :(
 

Deadliestviper7

The Necromancer
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Aug 6, 2016
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This forum is bloody useless. Nearly a week this topic has been up and no one has replied. Lots of different questions and I was looking for advice, but what's the point if no one can be bothered to respond? This isn't the first time I've experienced this here either.

Most frustrating! :(
Should be fine man, carp are very adaptable , nothing here that is ununusaul.
Got any carp pics.?
 
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Dloks

Potamotrygon
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Ask my pond expert kendragon kendragon
 
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Jonathan Robinson

Feeder Fish
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Nov 2, 2016
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My favourite strain of carp are scaley mirrors, and I've specified that all of my fish (that come in November) are scaley:

 

MrsE88

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That is a beautiful carp.
I’ve never ran any kind of continuous drip system, any idea what the water clarity will be like? With fish that blend in so well if the water isn’t very clear you’ll only ever see them when feeding.
 

Jonathan Robinson

Feeder Fish
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Nov 2, 2016
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The water quality from the spring is excellent and is near enough drinking quality. The farmer (in his 70s) has drunk it his entire life.

I'm quite happy to see them a little less than koi. With the large window in the side, I should have a good view.
 

MrsE88

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Oh I’m sure the water quality is great, I just ment with no mechanical filter to get the particles out even having a window you won’t see much but green/brown water and things suspended in it.
I like your idea and I’m sure you’ll see great growth from the carp. A mechanical filter could always be added later if you feel the “visual” isn’t where you want it to be.
It was just the first thing that popped into my head when I saw no mention of a filter for the water.
 

xraycer

Alligator Gar
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Sep 5, 2013
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Personally, I would increase that rate closer to 20% per day. Just to get to at least 100% turnover per week. Also, water plants will be beneficial for water quality purposes, as well as aesthetics. Plants that requires soil can be planted in pots.

In regards to mechanical filtration, instead of using wavewakers, why not utilize a water pump. Pump water up to a large tub above the pond, and drill large holes towards the bottom of this tub as drainage ports back into the pond. Fill the tub with inexpensive polyester pillow stuffing, to act as a mechanical filtration media. Water from pump dumps out on top of tub and on to polyester, water works it's way down to the bottom of the tub, and exits drilled holes back into pond. Setting the tub about a foot above the pond's water surface will create agitation to provide water movement throughout pond, and aid in oxygen exchange.
You may also have an issue with green water due to algae growth. Tinting the clear roof may help, or you may have to cover the roof with a tarp most of the time.
 
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