Mudskipper paludarium- an alternative solution

Rafini

Piranha
MFK Member
Jun 28, 2012
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Calgary, Canada
HX67 can I just say kiitos for all of your knowledge and amazing set ups, I recently (for probably the 4th time) went through your lengthy thread on the planted tank and just amazed and inspired.
One day I would love to set something up like that, and preferably keep mudskippers too (not to mention some awesome plants) keep being an inspiration to the hobby!

and in response to potentially breeding mudskippers, I saw on the LIFE documentary that mudskippers breed in U shaped tunnels, they lay their eggs on the upper surface of the tunnel, then they take gulps of water out until the level is below the eggs, this creates a moist humid environment to grow their eggs. They will periodically take gulps of fresh air, dive into their tunnel and release it near the eggs to keep them well oxygenated. it was really cool to watch and if anyone in the hobby could pull off breeding them it would be you.

Take it easy
Rafini
 
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HX67

Plecostomus
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Jan 25, 2008
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HX67 can I just say kiitos for all of your knowledge and amazing set ups, I recently (for probably the 4th time) went through your lengthy thread on the planted tank and just amazed and inspired.
One day I would love to set something up like that, and preferably keep mudskippers too (not to mention some awesome plants) keep being an inspiration to the hobby!

and in response to potentially breeding mudskippers, I saw on the LIFE documentary that mudskippers breed in U shaped tunnels, they lay their eggs on the upper surface of the tunnel, then they take gulps of water out until the level is below the eggs, this creates a moist humid environment to grow their eggs. They will periodically take gulps of fresh air, dive into their tunnel and release it near the eggs to keep them well oxygenated. it was really cool to watch and if anyone in the hobby could pull off breeding them it would be you.

Take it easy
Rafini
Kiitos right back atcha, Rafini.
It's amazing how refreshing it is to hear an occasional mention of inspiring someone.
Can't thank you enough for this.

Due to some uncalled for feedback (funny what the internet generates) I've been a bit lazy updating the old or publishing new projects.

Now. There's actually a couple of successful reports on mudsie breeding in aquarium. Great stuff!
Been studying that cave structure that's actually been the basis for the success. Both I've seen have used mud substrate in the tank, and the skippers have dug their holes in it.
Another factor seems to be the position of the cave. They like it at the tide level, so that high tide flushes the babies when they are ready...

Now i*m still using sand. But I'm seeing a lot of digging behaviour in the corners of the pools in the tank.
When I overhauled this tank due to the mealybug infestation, I molded a few caves in the scape. And timed some of the circulation to mimic tide.
Remains to be seen whether the fish will accept them as a substitute...

Anyhow. I'm desperately seeking for a few female septemradiatus to put the caves into test.

Thanks again, Kanook.
Hope you get around to setting up a tank for these hoppers!
 

Rafini

Piranha
MFK Member
Jun 28, 2012
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Calgary, Canada
I saw a video on youtube where someone made a tide system for their mudskipper where the tank would periodically drain and refill with some fancy plumbing and electronics.

I'm thinking if they did begin digging in your dirted set up you would have to switch of the filters until the dust had settled to avoid clogging and or destroying your filter.

It definately would require a tank built entirely around the purpose of breeding them, but if it could be done then lots of european hobbyists could brag that they have some captive bred mudskippers from Finland ;)

Keep up the good work ystäväni. (I have a lot of finnish music in my collection lol)
 

HX67

Plecostomus
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Jan 25, 2008
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I saw a video on youtube where someone made a tide system for their mudskipper where the tank would periodically drain and refill with some fancy plumbing and electronics.

I'm thinking if they did begin digging in your dirted set up you would have to switch of the filters until the dust had settled to avoid clogging and or destroying your filter.

It definately would require a tank built entirely around the purpose of breeding them, but if it could be done then lots of european hobbyists could brag that they have some captive bred mudskippers from Finland ;)

Keep up the good work ystäväni. (I have a lot of finnish music in my collection lol)

I know, the tide systems are amazing.
My poor man's version is taking it to the pools in this tank. I time the circulation on 6 hour intervals. The pools fill up and drain. The pipes molded in the hardscape stay filled with water, but the passage is dry every other 6 hour period...

Next week I'm hopefully getting a new patch of septemradiatus. Hope there's females among them.

Oh, wow! Whad'ya listen to?
Check out Poets Of The Fall, if you haven't already.

And thanks, again!
 

kkirkt

Exodon
MFK Member
Mar 23, 2017
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HX67- I've enjoyed reading through your build thread (several times). I hope to build a setup similar to what you did eventually but right now my skippers only have floating turtle docks and a few other above the waterline decorations (https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/pics-of-mudskippers-and-hog-chokers.700040/).
I'd love to know what sources you researched for your skippers. Based on the little I could find I thought a slightly higher specific gravity was best (not criticizing, just asking). I have Periophthalmus Septemradiatus, I think. Hard to verify with online pics.
Also any other info you have would be greatly appreciated. And did your first group of skippers die? How long did they live?
And if you ever want a fun brackish oddball to add, consider a hogchoker. I love mine (although they are not active fish at all!).
Again, thanks for the inspiration!!!
 
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HX67

Plecostomus
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Jan 25, 2008
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HX67- I've enjoyed reading through your build thread (several times). I hope to build a setup similar to what you did eventually but right now my skippers only have floating turtle docks and a few other above the waterline decorations (https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/pics-of-mudskippers-and-hog-chokers.700040/).
I'd love to know what sources you researched for your skippers. Based on the little I could find I thought a slightly higher specific gravity was best (not criticizing, just asking). I have Periophthalmus Septemradiatus, I think. Hard to verify with online pics.
Also any other info you have would be greatly appreciated. And did your first group of skippers die? How long did they live?
And if you ever want a fun brackish oddball to add, consider a hogchoker. I love mine (although they are not active fish at all!).
Again, thanks for the inspiration!!!
Hey, sorry for not answering you before, just noticed your message.
My email got cancelled for heavy traffic by someone using it for thrash and was never recovered. Soooo, I've been getting no alerts...

Thanks for your kind words, much appreciated!

Now I'm sorry to say I can't give you any links. But I've studied every scientific study I have found. According to them, septemradiatus is found exceptionally (for a skippy) high upriver and indeed ranges from salinities starting at 1.000.
My tank fluctuates in between 1,003-1,006.

I've still got two of the original group, had them for a couple of years when I started this thread. Also, they were adults when I got them, so 10+ is my guess.

Gotta check those hogchokers now. Just skippies in this tank nowadays.

Again, thanks alot and sorry for the delay.
 

kkirkt

Exodon
MFK Member
Mar 23, 2017
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I've still got two of the original group, had them for a couple of years when I started this thread. Also, they were adults when I got them, so 10+ is my guess.

Gotta check those hogchokers now. Just skippies in this tank nowadays.
Thanks for the reply. I'm glad to get a rough idea of how long the skippers might live.

Mine are still quite shy. I'm hoping I'll eventually get them eating out of my hand (like I've seen online). Considering how long you've been able to keep them going, any recommendations on food would be welcome. I feed mine (thawed) dozen food (brine shrimp, Mysis-, etc- all store bought) and crickets. Occasionally I'll give them an earthworm.

As for the hogchokers- I really enjoy mine but I have to be careful with feeding (otherwise my mollies would eat the worms). I love to see them practically inhale the worms.

Thanks again for the thread (and inspiration).
 

HX67

Plecostomus
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Jan 25, 2008
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They do eat outta my hand. A bit of shyness but when hungry, no prob.

I feed my guys a very varied diet.
I keep lizards, so there's live food to put in at all times. I breed tropical cockroaches, babies go down nicely for the skippies. Mealworms on occasion, crickets on another.

Earthworms is one of the greatest things to give your fish, in my opinion! I do that, during summer months.

Frozen fish food, red worms and mysis I collect myself go down well.

But I guess what they eat most is the frozen food I make myself.

I make a mixture of the following:

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400 g shrimp (with shells)
400 g pollock
200 g (blue) mussel
400-500 g peas
400-500 g spinach
2 carrots (missing from the pic)
2 eggs (with shells)
pork/beef heart
beef liver (also missing from the pic)
1 banana
a few cloves garlic
juice of 1 lemon
a bit of multivitamin
spirulina powder
gelatin

The only ingredient I cook is liver.
Everything is chopped raw into a fine pulp in a mixer/mincer.
Gelatin is prepared with hot water and mixed into the pulp.

Pulp is packed into bags, thinly enough so the frozen sheet is easy to break into appropriate pieces.

Bags are chilled for a few hours to let the gelatin set.
Then they are frozen.

End result:

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(The color is deep green, almost blackish from the spirulina I added lavishly into this lot)

My fish, shrimps and aquatic amphibians love it.


They do eat pretty much anything I offer, so dried fish foods also go down.

Thanks, you!
 

twentyleagues

Bronze Tier VIP
MFK Member
Apr 5, 2017
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Flint town!
I like how you're keeping track of your thread after all this time! Awesome work! Would love to see some updates. Your background was a reason I started making backgrounds too. Mine are nowhere near the detail of yours though.
 
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