Not Testing Water Before Housing Fish

RomyD85

Gambusia
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 2, 2018
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I was told that i didn’t need to test the water before housing fish in a new freshwater aquarium - so I haven’t been able to test the ammonia, nitrite or nitrate levels yet, however I have placed fish in the aquarium. I added Fluval products like water conditioner and biological enhancer before getting the fish and I followed the instructions on the bottle, and waited 5/6 days before I got the fish. I was researching water testing kits but I couldn’t afford one, but it wasnt until I was told by my (now I realise not so trustworthy) salesman, that it wasn’t necessary. I thought it was?

I know when a water change is due and what my set day is and how much I should take out and how often - should I invest in a water testing kit as well? And if so, how often should I be doing water tests? Do I need to know the levels of my tap water as well to compare the tank water to?
 

aotechs

Jack Dempsey
MFK Member
Nov 17, 2015
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Columbus, OH
No problem.

How often should you test?

Test your water before and after water changes until you become familiar with its maintenance requirements. You should test water straight out of the tap periodically as well.
 

esoxlucius

Redtail Catfish
MFK Member
Dec 30, 2015
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I'm curious. You say you know when your water change is due and how much to take out but you currently have no means of testing your water! Without knowing your parameters you can't possibly make that call.
 

twentyleagues

Blue Tier VIP
MFK Member
Apr 5, 2017
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Flint town!
I was told that i didn’t need to test the water before housing fish in a new freshwater aquarium - so I haven’t been able to test the ammonia, nitrite or nitrate levels yet, however I have placed fish in the aquarium. I added Fluval products like water conditioner and biological enhancer before getting the fish and I followed the instructions on the bottle, and waited 5/6 days before I got the fish. I was researching water testing kits but I couldn’t afford one, but it wasnt until I was told by my (now I realise not so trustworthy) salesman, that it wasn’t necessary. I thought it was?

I know when a water change is due and what my set day is and how much I should take out and how often - should I invest in a water testing kit as well? And if so, how often should I be doing water tests? Do I need to know the levels of my tap water as well to compare the tank water to?
It sounds as though you've been given some not so good info from your "not so trustworthy " salesman. You should test so (as stated by another) you know when to change your water and how much. Also depending on the type of fish you are keeping care requirements can vary alot, some animals will tolerate a much higher nitrate level then others that's just 1 aspect. I'm going to go out on a limb and guess sa or ca type cichlids? Most of these need super clean water alot of "not so trustworthy" salesmen won't tell you that. High nitrate levels will cause HLLE or some call it hole in the head disease in alot of sa/ ca cichlids. Testing isn't needed if you don't care what happens to the animals in your care. Other then that it is needed, warranted and generally thought of as normal in taking care of fish. This is a great site with great people willing to help you thank you for posting this question and keep asking questions it helps you and lots of newbies.

Sorry I get ummm....."excited" by sales people giving bad info. Lol
 
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skjl47

Probation Member
Probation Member
May 16, 2011
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I followed the instructions on the bottle, and waited 5/6 days before I got the fish.
Hello; Do you yet know of the "cycle" process? That may be your next best research goal. With a test kit you can check on things such ass ammonia.

told that i didn’t need to
salesman, that it wasn’t necessary.
Hello; Here the words needed and necessary come into play. Tanks can be run without testing the water so in a sense the kits are not strictly needed. However I do suggest water testing for those without experience. With decades of experience a fish keeper can learn what works, but even with that experience having a test kit on hand is a good idea.
know when a water change is due and what
no means of testing your water! Without knowing your parameters you can't possibly make that call.
Hello; Sounds like you are on some sort of pre established schedule. May be spot on and fine and also may be way off and inadequate.
 
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