Rare Speartooth Shark (Glyphis glyphis)

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Jack Dempsey
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"The speartooth shark (Glyphis glyphis) is an extremely rare species of river shark, belonging to the family Carcharhinidae. It inhabits coastal marine waters and tidal reaches of large tropical rivers in northern Australia and New Guinea. Adults grow to about 2.6 m (8.5 ft) long."

"Extremely rare like other river sharks, its global population has been estimated to number no more than 2,500 mature individuals, with no more than 250 in any subpopulation."

"Furthermore, in Australia, it has been listed as critically endangered on the 1999 Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, though this is of minimal effect as commonwealth protection does not apply until a distance of three nautical miles from the coast, likely outside the range of this shark."

From the wiki

What an interesting species. Would love to see an 8.5 feet one.
 

tlindsey

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Beautiful Shark would be very sad if the specie went extinct.
 

coolcomfort

Jack Dempsey
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Beautiful Shark would be very sad if the specie went extinct.
I think in a lot of these situations, there should be a government funded group of people that assess a couple of factors
  • Can I get this fish to breed in a large aquarium?
  • Can I easily transport this fish without causing much death?
  • Will these fish behave normally when surrounding each other
  • Can we force fish to breed, aka artificial insemination
Then we search far and wide for whatever remaining animals there are in order to breed. Then we breed the species in order to prevent extinction.

I was reading something interesting about the Popoto dolphin. It's the worlds smallest dolphin with roughly 40-50 species left. Most would say the species is doomed. At this point, you would assume that there are too few to successfully breed without avoiding defects. However, that is not actually the case. If the genetics vary significantly between dolphin to dolphin, they can successfully breed enough to beat extinction. But how could we reach that breeding? Only with the method above. Through artificial insemination we could prevent these species from dying out then bring them back into the wild once the number has grown successfully.

To those of you who will say this is inhumane, I don't care. If you look at humans through any tree hugging lens you could easily say we are the most inhumane species of all time. I'd say preventing these species from dying is one step in the right direction. After all, we are "responsible" for their extinction according to many of their arguments.
 
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Landon Studer

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The spear tooth is actually my favorite shark
 
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