Sharks At Home: PROFILE DATABASE

water_baby83

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2006
1,523
4
0
36
UnDeR tHe SeA
www.myspace.com
Will soon contain profiles and images of the following;
*Brown Banded Bamboo Sharks, Chiloscyllium punctatum
*White Spotted Bamboo Sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum
*Grey Bamboo Shark, Chiloscyllium griseum
*Hasselt's (Indonesian) Bamboo Shark, Chiloscyllium hasseltii
*Slender bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium indicum
*Horn Shark, Heterodontus francisci
*Crested (bullhead) Horn Shark, Heterodontus galeatus
*Japanese Bullhead Shark, Heterodontus japonicus
*Mexican Horn Shark, Heterodontus mexicanus
*Port Jackson Shark, Heterodontus portusjacksoni
*Whitespotted bullhead shark, Heterodontus ramalheira
*Zebra bullhead shark, Heterodontus zebra
*Spiny Dogfish Shark, Squalus acanthias
*Epaulette shark, Hemiscyllium ocellatum
*Speckled carpetshark, Hemiscyllium trispeculare
*Indonesian speckled carpetshark, Hemiscyllium freycineti
*Tasselled wobbegong, Eucrossorhinus dasypogon
*Ornate wobbegong, Orectolobus ornatus
*Dwarf spotted wobbegong, Orectolobus parvimaculatus
*Japanese wobbegong, Orectolobus japonicus
*Cobbler wobbegong, Sutorectus tentaculatus
*Leopard Shark, Triakis semifasciata
*Gummy Shark, Mustelus antarcticus
*Atlantic Sharpnose shark, Rhizoprionodon terraenovae


***For Catsharks, feel free to PM me on profiles you'd like to see. I'm not about to do them all. LOL.



>>>>Note: I will only do profiles for this thread on sharks which are either common for private aquarists - or - are one's which can be reasonably obtained and adequately housed by advanced private aquarists. This means I will NOT cover sharks such as Tigers, Makos, Whites, Nurses - (even though yes, some people keep them, it's not one I am even going to advertise right now), Bulls, Hammerheads, etc. . .
If you would like a profile done on a qualifying species, and do not see it listed above (because no, I didn't list them all), then please PM me.
Even if a species is not available to all, depending on their local and federal laws, it's ok. MFK is an international site, so if it's one which is legal to own (even if only in parts of the world), and is one of which is known to be kept by private aquarists, PM me and I will see what I can do.


***If you would like to contribute to any of these profiles, PM me and let me know which one you are interested in working on. I will flag it on my list, and work with you in creating the profile. Once completed, you will send me a full version, of which I will check for accuracy, images and overall information provided, and then add it into this database thread. Do understand however, that I may change, add onto, remove, or re-arrange some of your information to make it easier for the reader, more accurate and complete.


----------------------------------------------------------------------


Sharks At Home:
Shark Profile Database


Sharks are perhaps the most wanted and, when owned, prized fish, that a private aquarist can have. Their elegance appeals to many, along with the respect they demand in whole. Over the years, shark keeping in the private sector has become increasingly popular. And while one would like to think that anyone taking on the challenge and responsibility of keeping a shark at home would be educated, financially blessed, and responsible... that is far too often not the case.
While sharks may just be the "Crem Del Le Crem" to the vast majority of private saltwater aquarists, they are also an animal which is poorly understood by that same vast majority. Lack of education, coupled with unrealistic and downright selfish attitudes towards keeping these animals has led to a demand for them in the aquarium trade, and sadly, mortalities reaching epidemic proportions.
While it's no wonder that your serious, and advanced saltwater aquarist would want to own a shark, it's mindblowing that so many of them would fail to research and plan ahead, and then responsibly provide for these animals once in their possession.
But this isn't an issue which blame rests soley on the consumer. Aquatic retailors are just as much to blame, if not more. For afterall, they are the ones placing these animals into the hands of the innexperienced, uneducated, and unprepared individuals all to make a buck.
We can't control the retail aspect of all things however, and until state and federal laws crack those whips, it's up to us - the "customers" to make the right decisions, and not offer further support to immoral and unethical businesses.
In this thread you will see a broad range of shark species which are most suitable for private captivity. Not all of them are ones which most, or even a great handful would be able to care for, so you should not assume that just because it's listed, you yourself could even come close to responsibly owning one of these animals.
This thread is not meant to encourage individuals to keep sharks, but rather, to educate the one's who intend to do it anyway, and to hopefully enlighten them as to the true commitment they are taking on, and the long-term dedication and responsibility that these animals will require.

Below you will note a "Can I do it" checklist, which will highlight the very basic things you would need to consider and be able to answer YES to, in order to consider moving forward in owning a shark. If you cannot honestly answer "yes" to each question, then at this point, you are not qualified to house sharks.


CAN I DO IT?
Basic Check-list For All Shark Keepers
This list is NOT all inclusive, but should serve as a basic reference

1) Can I correctly identify all major parts of basic shark anatomy?
2) Do I understand shark biology?
3) Do I have a firm grasp on what sharks require;
- Their Dietary Needs
- Their Mobility Requirements
- Their Social Adaptations and Behavioral Patterns
- Their Environmental Sensitivities
4) Can I provide the necessary space for a shark right now?
5) Can I devote 20+ hours every week towards maintenance of their housing;
- Filters, Pumps and Internal Circulatory and Regulatory Parts
- Water Parameters
- Substrates and Decor
- Electrical Testing, and General Upkeep of vacinity
*Observation;
- Swim Pattens
- Social Interactions
- Posturing
- Breathing Patterns
- Physical Appearances
*Feeding;
- Preparing
- Offering Foods
- Monitoring Consumption & Digestion
- Administering Supplements
- Clean-up
6) Can I afford a water bill easily 5x's what I pay now - every month?
7) Can I afford an electricity bill easily 5x's what I pay now - every month?
8) Can I afford to purchase high quality fresh seafood in bulk 1-2 times per week, year round?
9) Can I afford the equipment I will need to set up a holding suitable for a shark?
10) Do I even know what I need as far as equipment goes?
11) Am I going to be able to house, feed and care for this shark for the next 20 years?


Though this list is not to be seen as an all-inclusive check list, it offers the very basic considerations one needs to have before they can move forward in becomming a shark keeper. If you cannot answer YES to each and every one of these questions, in addition to knowing off the top of your head what is required - as in question 10, then owning a shark isn't something you are prepared to do at this point. Taking the time to research and educate yourself on these amazing animals, planning well in advance and really taking a responsible approach; making provisions to comfortably house this animal long term will not only provide you with the confidence, know-how and preparedness to take on such a challenge, but will also help to ensure that you never become part of the problem surrounding unethical treatment and irresponsible keeping of our ocean's apex predators.







<<Under Construction>>
 

water_baby83

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2006
1,523
4
0
36
UnDeR tHe SeA
www.myspace.com
Brown Banded Bamboo
Chiloscyllium punctatum




Common Name: Brown Banded Bamboo Shark

Scientific Name: Chiloscyllium punctatum

Alias: Black Banded Bamboo Shark, Brown Banded Cat Shark, Black Banded Cat Shark, Bamboo Cat Shark, etc.

Maximum Recorded Adult Size: As documented, 42inches (though claims of larger)


Average Adult Size: The vast majority of adults reach between 38-40 inches when fully grown.



Size at Birth: Can range anywhere from 5.5 inches to 7 inches

Size at Sexual Maturity: Generally between 27-30 inches for males, slightly smaller for females at typically 25-26 inches.

Age at Sexual Maturity: Most often between 3 and 4 years of age, however can stall up to 5 years dependant on environment.Typically sooner if kept in a pair of male and female.


Reproduction: They are oviparous - meaning they are egg-laying sharks. Paired eggs are released into the benthic environment, generally between coral reef rifts or in dense vegetation along shorelines. Measuring 4.3x5.9 inches (11x15 cm), the egg casing is elongated and flattened. The embryo feeds entirely on the yolk within the egg case until they hatch. Once hatched, it is not uncommon for a small portion of the yolk to still be attached, unabsorbed by the newborn (Do not ever attempt to remove any remaining yolk as you could severely injure the shark. It will either be absorbed or discarded naturally with no assist necessary). Within it's first days of life, the pup will maintain from the nutrients provided by the yolk. As it's digested and passed, the newly born pup will start to demonstrate novice predatory behaviors and start to show increased interest in live prey.

Growth Rate: Can grow up to 12 inches within the first two years, tapering to an average of 5-6 inches until sexual maturity is reached, with final growth generally achieved 1-2 years after sexual maturity is reached (however it can be sooner). Growth in captive environments can vary greatly by diet and available space for the animal. Over-feeding should be avoided and ample swimming room provided, as though this is a benthic shark, it will actively swim during night hours.

Longevity of species: With excellent care and health, up to 25 years.


Geographical Distribution: Distributed in the Indo-West Pacific region including off India, Thailand (along the east coast and the Andaman Islands), Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia (Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, and Komodo), Viet Nam, China, Taiwan, Japan, and Philippines. This species is also found off the southern coast of New Guinea (Papua-New Guinea and Iriah Jaya, Indonesia) and northern coast of Australia (Northern Territory, Western Australia, and Queensland).


Habitat: Commonly found in shallow coral reefs and over sandy and muddy bottom habitats ranging in depth from 1-279 feet (.33-85 m). Typically considered a solitary animal, it's been known to "bunk" with several others in caves, under rock ledges and in reef hollows. As a nocturnal feeder, they are more active at night when they dig and blow the sediments in search of prey. An extremely hardy species, often observed in tide pools and can tolerate hypoxia for extended periods of time. In the home aquarium, a thick, fine sandy bottom is required. Coarse substrate or rocks will easily irritate the belly of this shark, opening the door for infection and painful lesions. Any rock structures should be securely situated in the tank, so that they are not able to be knocked over by the shark, and in a manner which offers plenty of hiding/resting spots which are either dim or void of tank lighting. Plenty of sand-bed should be left exposed and tank should be wide enough and long enough to accomodate easy navigation without the need for tight turns. Corners should be absent, does best in rounded tanks or ones with corner-fillers applied to the internal angles. Minimum size tank required is 180gallons with the minimum tank suggested at being 220 gallons for one adult. Dimentions of tank are far more imporant than actual gallons, and tank should be constructed with shark's adult size in consideration.

Diet: Feeds primarily on benthic organisms and small fishes, crabs, polychaete worms and shrimps. In the home aquarium, will readily accept cut silversides, prawns, clams, scallops, squid, octopus, salmon and more. Can be difficult to establish regular feedings if hatched from birth, unless with a skilled aquarist. Some metabolic aids, such as garlic can be used to generate interest in foods. Should have a supplemented diet to ensure proper levels of minerals and vitamins are being injested, and an iodine-booster vitamin to avoid goiters.

Activity level: Nocturnal by nature, the highest level of activity is between just after dusk and two hours before dawn. During the daylight hours, these sharks prefer shaded, low turbulance areas, and often will seek out caves or similar crevices to tuck themselves into. In the home aquarium, they will seem to scarcly move during the daylight hours, or while tank lights are on. To induce activity, lights can be turned off early, with low moonlights to offer ease of viewing. Will generally locate a "favorite" spot in the home aquarium, and can trick aquarists into thinking it hasn't moved, as it will return to that same spot as dawn approaches.

Identifying Characteristics: The brownbanded bambooshark has a slender body with an elongated and thick precaudal tail. The mouth is located closer to the eyes than to the rounded tip of the snout. Two spiracles can be found below and behind the eyes. Both dorsal fins are of narly equal size with the origin of the first dorsal fin located opposite the anterior (back) halves of the pelvic fin bases or slightly behind the pelvic fin origins. The pectoral fins are straight with very broad tips. The anal fin is just in front of the rear tip of the second dorsal fin. The caudal fin has a distinct subterminal notch, the ventral lobe is absent. The body does not have a lateral dermal ridge. Predorsal and interdorsal ridges lack prominence. Juvenile markings range from black to brown banding dorso-ventrally (top to bottom), with a basal coloration from white to a muddy tan. As the individual matures, juvenile bandings fade into the basal coloring, and as a full grown adult, the body lacks any prominent coloration variations, lightening in whole to a sandy tan.


Preferred Water Temperature & Conditions: Being a tropical species, warmer waters are preferred. Best range is between 73-80F. Will not tolerate temperatures below 70F. Salinity should be kept between 1.023-1.026 SG, and pH should range between 8.1-8.4. Will not tolerate pH below 8.0, or SG below 1.021. Zero Ammonia, Zero Nitrates/Nitrites.


Shark in Captivity: These sharks are perhaps the most commonly kept species in captivity - both in public and private aquaria. Does well in captivity, one of the hardiest. Like all sharks, is highly sensitive to metal, magnets, copper and parameter fluctuations. Is not suited for the beginning salt aquarist, however, considered the best species for the beginning shark keeper.

Reef Compatablity: Fair. Will eat smaller crustaceans and fish if it has the opportunity. Is a small but strong shark and can knock over rocks and other structures not properly anchored. Will not disturb most corals, however, might lay on Mushrooms or Zoanthids, or dislodge newly planted frags.

Tankmate Compatability: Best kept with juvenile Snappers, Hawks, Hogs, Rabbits, Lions/Scorpions, Grunts/Sweetlips, other similar Sharks (whitespotted bamboos, horns), Rays, larger Angels, Parrots, Tangs/Surgeonfishes. Triggers and Puffers will nip at the shark's fins. Most all "cleaner crews" are fine, but may become a snack if too small.

Conservation: The brownbanded bambooshark is listed as "Near Threatened" on the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List due to concern over impact of human activities on this species throughout most of its range. The largest threats include collection for human consumption and blackmarket trades, habitat degradation from pollution, reef destructon, dynamite and cyanide fishing. Collection for the aquarium trade is considered to be a minor threat since this species is hardy and breeds well in captive environments.




Information and Photographs from: Myself, Flmnh, Jstor.com, SaltAquarium, Wiki, oceanlight.com, Arkive.org, MBA, cites, IUCN, and various segments from the Elasmobranch Husbandry manual and colleagues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: AncientFishArk

water_baby83

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2006
1,523
4
0
36
UnDeR tHe SeA
www.myspace.com
Whitespotted Bamboo
Chiloscyllium plagiosum



Common Name: Whitespotted Bamboo Shark

Scientific Name: Chiloscyllium plagiosum

Alias: Carpet Shark, Whitespotted Catshark

Maximum Recorded Adult Size: The maximum reported length of a female whitespotted bambooshark is 37.4 inches (95cm) total length; the maximum reported length of a male specimen of this species is 32.7 inches (83cm).


Average Adult Size: The average size of an adult ranges from 23.6-31.5 inches (60-80cm).


Size at Birth: Hatchlings measuring 3.9-4.9 inches (9.8-12.5cm) in length have been documented.


Size at Sexual Maturity: It is known that males and females reach sexual maturity at total lengths of approximately 25.6 inches (65cm).

Age at Sexual Maturity:


Reproduction: They are oviparous - meaning they are egg-laying sharks. Paired eggs are released into the benthic environment, generally between coral reef rifts or in dense vegetation along shorelines. Measuring 4.3x5.9 inches (11x15 cm), the egg casing is elongated and flattened. The embryo feeds entirely on the yolk within the egg case until they hatch. Once hatched, it is not uncommon for a small portion of the yolk to still be attached, unabsorbed by the newborn (Do not ever attempt to remove any remaining yolk as you could severely injure the shark. It will either be absorbed or discarded naturally with no assist necessary). Within it's first days of life, the pup will maintain from the nutrients provided by the yolk. As it's digested and passed, the newly born pup will start to demonstrate novice predatory behaviors and start to show increased interest in live prey.

Growth Rate:

Longevity of species: It is believed that the White Spotted Bamboo shark may live up to twenty-five years, if not slightly longer in the wild. In captivity, longevity ranges, due to many factors. Some of which are still not totally realized. Factors such as environmental conditions, dietary insufficiencies, metal and/or chemical toxicity, and more, are all risks that threaten sharks in the home aquaria, that would be significantly lowered in the wild.


Geographical Distribution: The whitespotted bambooshark is found in the Indo-west Pacific region including waters off Madagascar, India, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Viet Nam, China, Taiwan, Japan, the Philippines, and in parts around Malaysia. This species has also been reported in Korea.


Habitat: Lives in inshore subtropical and tropical reef waters, spending most of it's time directly on and around the reef. The long slender body shape of this species lends itself well to gliding along coral reefs. Currently, there is little known about the life history, daily habits and ranges of depth of the whitespotted bambooshark. In the home aqurium, any rock structures should be securely situated in the tank, so that they are not able to be knocked over by the shark, and in a manner which offers plenty of hiding/resting spots which are either dim or void of tank lighting. Plenty of sand-bed should be left exposed and tank should be wide enough and long enough to accomodate easy navigation without the need for tight turns. Corners should be absent, does best in rounded tanks or ones with corner-fillers applied to the internal angles. Minimum size tank required is 180gallons with the minimum tank suggested at being 220 gallons for one adult. Dimentions of tank are far more imporant than actual gallons, and tank should be constructed with shark's adult size in consideration.

Diet: Feeds primarily on benthic organisms and small fishes, crabs, polychaete worms and shrimps. In the home aquarium, will readily accept cut silversides, prawns, clams, scallops, squid, octopus, salmon and more. Can be difficult to establish regular feedings if hatched from birth, unless with a skilled aquarist. Some metabolic aids, such as garlic can be used to generate interest in foods. Should have a supplemented diet to ensure proper levels of minerals and vitamins are being injested, and an iodine-booster vitamin to avoid goiters.

Activity level: Nocturnal by nature, the highest level of activity is between just after dusk and two hours before dawn. During the daylight hours, these sharks prefer shaded, low turbulance areas, and often will seek out caves or similar crevices to tuck themselves into. In the home aquarium, they will seem to scarcly move during the daylight hours, or while tank lights are on. To induce activity, lights can be turned off early, with low moonlights to offer ease of viewing. Will generally locate a "favorite" spot in the home aquarium, and can trick aquarists into thinking it hasn't moved, as it will return to that same spot as dawn approaches.

Identifying Characteristics: The body is stout with a rounded, semi-blunt snout. There are spiracles located below the eyes. Sensory barbels present near each nostril. Unlike the Brown Banded Bamboo, there is a prominent lateral ridge on each side of the torso. Dorsal fins are of equal size, and approximately the same size as the pelvic fins. The origin of the first dorsal fin is positioned over the insertion of the pelvic fins. The pectoral fins are muscular and flexible and can be used to crawl along the bottom, giving a "walking" appearance to the shark. The anal fin terminates just anterior (behind) the caudal fin. The length of the precaudal tail is much longer than the body and head combined. The caudal fin has a pronounced subterminal notch; there is no ventral lobe present on this species. The body is dark brown to varying shades of muddy grey with some dark transverse bands as well as numerous irregular white or bluish spots along the length of the head and body. This species can be distinguished from other similar Bamboo sharks by its unique coloration pattern.

In captivity, there have been three albino whitespotted bamboosharks hatched at Sea World in Orlando, Florida (US).



Preferred Water Temperature & Conditions: Being a tropical species, warmer waters are preferred. Best range is between 73-80F. Will not tolerate temperatures below 70F. Salinity should be kept between 1.023-1.026 SG, and pH should range between 8.1-8.4. Will not tolerate pH below 8.0, or SG below 1.021. Zero Ammonia, Zero Nitrates/Nitrites.


Shark in Captivity: Because these sharks are smaller species, and live a primarily benthic life, they are of the more common to be kept in captivity, both commercially and in the home aquarium. Whitespotted Bamboo sharks have a positive history of feeding well and breeding in a captive setting, and therefore are more readily available than other smaller species, as is the Brown Banded Bamboo. Like all sharks, is highly sensitive to metal, magnets, copper and parameter fluctuations. Is not suited for the beginning salt aquarist.

Reef Compatablity: Fair. Will eat smaller crustaceans and fish if it has the opportunity. Is a small but strong shark and can knock over rocks and other structures not properly anchored. Will not disturb most corals, however, might lay on Mushrooms or Zoanthids, or dislodge newly planted frags.

Tankmate Compatability: Best kept with juvenile Snappers, Hawks, Hogs, Rabbits, Lions/Scorpions, Grunts/Sweetlips, other similar Sharks (Brown Banded Bamboos, Horns), Rays, larger Angels, Parrots, Tangs/Surgeonfishes. Triggers and Puffers will nip at the shark's fins. Most all "cleaner crews" are fine, but may become a snack if too small.

Conservation: The White Spotted Bamboo Shark is listed as "Near Threatened" on the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List due to concern over impact of human activities on this species throughout most of its range. The largest threats include collection for human consumption and blackmarket trades, commercial fishing and human consumption largely in the Asian regions, habitat degradation from pollution, reef destructon, dynamite and cyanide fishing. Collection for the aquarium trade is considered to be slightly more of a threat than that of the Brown Banded, since this species is a little more sensitive than it's cousin in captive environments.






Information and Photographs from: Myself, Flmnh, Jstor.com, SaltAquarium, Wiki, oceanlight.com, Arkive.org, MBA, cites, IUCN, and various segments from the Elasmobranch Husbandry manual and colleagues.
 

water_baby83

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2006
1,523
4
0
36
UnDeR tHe SeA
www.myspace.com
<<In progress>>
Grey Banded Bamboo
Chiloscyllium griseum




Common Name: Grey Banded Bamboo Shark

Scientific Name: Chiloscyllium griseum

Alias: Carpet Shark, Gray Catshark, Gray Bamboo Shark, etc.

Maximum Recorded Adult Size: The recorded maximum adult size for the Gray Bamboo Sharks is reported at a total length at least 77 cm. There is no discernable distinction in adult sizes from male to female, as has been recorded, though this is a species of which observations are more limited, and thus information is subject to modify as research progresses.





Average Adult Size: The more common average size that has been noted in that of the Gray Bamboo shark ranges from 72-74cm in total length, slight variations occuring dependant on diet and environmental influences.

Size At Birth:

Size At Sexual Maturity: Male Gray Bamboo's typically reach sexual maturity between the lengths of 45 and 55 cm, whereas females typically will demonstrate sexual maturities between 60 and 65cm, however, when paired with a male, can be sooner.

Age At Sexual Maturity:


Reproduction:

Growth Rate:

Longevity Of Species:



Geographical Distribution: The Grey Banded Bamboo Shark is most commonly found in the Indo-West Pacific Oceans from the Arabian Sea to Pakistan, India, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, China, Japan, the Philippines, and Papua New Guinea, between

Habitat: A common, sluggish inshore bottom dweller, found on sandy and muddy bottoms, on rocks and in coral lagoons at depths from 5 to 80 m. Typically considered a solitary animal, it's been known to "bunk" with several others in caves, under rock ledges and in reef hollows. As a nocturnal feeder, they are more active at night, slipping over and around rock croppings and in shallow caves in search of prey. In the home aquarium, a thick, fine sandy bottom is required, though rocks are not nearly as discouraged as with other Bamboo sharks, as this species frequents more coarse terrain. Any rock structures should be securely situated in the tank, so that they are not able to be knocked over by the shark, and in a manner which offers plenty of hiding/resting spots which are either dim or void of tank lighting. Plenty of sand-bed should be left exposed and tank should be wide enough and long enough to accomodate easy navigation without the need for tight turns. Corners should be absent, does best in rounded tanks or ones with corner-fillers applied to the internal angles. Minimum size tank required is 240gallons with the minimum tank suggested at being 280gallons for one adult. Dimentions of tank are far more imporant than actual gallons, and tank should be constructed with shark's adult size in consideration, the actual footprint of available "surface space" - being the available living surfaces for the animal, being the most paramount.

Diet: Feeds mainly on small fish, shrimps, worms, mollusks and crabs.


Activity Level:


Identifying Characteristics: The snout is shorter and more stout, a prominent "tip" to the dorsal surface of the rostrum is noticeable in adults. The mouth is located on the ventral surface front of their rounded snout. The body is thick, and consistant with those of other species that fall within the generalization of "Carpet Sharks". There are spiracles located below the eyes. Sensory barbels present near each nostril, though notably smaller in size than other bamboo sharks. Dorsal fins are of varying size, the first dorsal being larger than the second. Pelvic fins are broader and slightly longer than the dorsal. The origin of the first dorsal fin is positioned intersecting the middle of the pelvic fins. The pectoral fins are muscular and flexible and can be used to crawl along the bottom, giving a "walking" appearance to the shark. The anal fin terminates just anterior (behind) the caudal fin. The length of the precaudal tail is generally longer than the body and head combined. The caudal fin has a pronounced subterminal notch; there is no ventral lobe present on this species. This species can be distinguished from other similar Bamboo sharks by its unique deficit in distinct patterns. Juvenile markings range from black to brown. Slight and thick bandings dorso-ventrally (top to bottom) may be seen in some animals, with a basal coloration usually only varying slightly from the basal coloration, and only on young juveniles. As the individual matures, juvenile bandings fade into the basal coloring, and as a full grown adult, the body lacks any prominent coloration variations, blending in whole to a dusky tan to deep brownish/gray.




Preferred Water Temperature & Conditions:

Shark In Captivity:

Reef Compatability:


Tankmate Compatability:

Conservation: The Grey Bamboo Shark is listed as "Near Threatened" on the World Conservation Union (IUCN) Red List. Regularly taken in inshore fisheries off Pakistan, India and Thailand, and utilized for human food, and is likely to be threatened by overfishing, destructive fishing practices and habitat modification, including the damage and destruction of coral reefs throughout much of its range. This species is kept in public aquaria in the United States (Compagno 2001) but significantly more rare in the aquarium trade (Michael 2001).
 

water_baby83

Feeder Fish
Original poster
MFK Member
Jan 30, 2006
1,523
4
0
36
UnDeR tHe SeA
www.myspace.com
Zfishies;4962905; said:
BUMP u nevered finished it =[ GREAT CARE INFO THO THANKS SO MUCH!
lol I know. But I haven't forgotten! Just full time work, full time school, full time two little ones and full time plethora of animals right now... I WILL devote some time to this thread very soon, I promise!
 

crister13

Feeder Fish
MFK Member
Jun 24, 2009
133
0
0
New Jersey
For the grey bamboo, it says 240g for an adult, but for the brownbanded, which get much larger, it says 220. Just wondering why. Did you mean to type 140?
 

Xxboy860xX

Feeder Fish
MFK Member
Sep 2, 2011
5
0
0
Mass
This was very informational. I am starting up a 180 gallon tank and will be puting in a brown banded bamboo shark along with a lionfish and ?.. im going to let my tank cycle for a couple months so i should def have some time to get a little more research in. =D All the work put into researching sharks will pay off and i will deffinately be posting more on here.
 

UltimateRayz

Feeder Fish
MFK Member
Aug 30, 2011
48
0
0
Rhode island
Great thread mate
 
zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store