Are micro-chipped/certified Asian arowanas OK in the US?

weston

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They're usually the result of law-enforcement seizures. Many asian aros in public aquariums are held until the end of smuggling trials. Then, they're disposed of. This is due to many public aquariums and research institutions not wishing to assume the costs involved with the permits. All permits require additional costs above the permit fee. Inspections, proper housing facilities (and containment), record-keeping and reporting, and renewal fees are all part of the permit process for keeping this species. Permits are only available to public aquariums and research institutions for public display and/or pre-approved bonafide research.
That sounds ridiculous how do they dispose of them by killing them? Aren't they considered an endangered species and that's why we aren't allowed to have them in the first place? if anything shouldn't they be sending them to a breeder somewhere or something instead of sending them to a public aquarium or putting them on death row. Actually if nothing else let the person keep it after they pay the fines like damn this is a perfect example of why we should question these restrictive laws in the first place they do more harm then good no one spending a couple hundred or even a couple grand on a more then likely captive bred fish is doing the thing any harm and they more then likely have all of the equipment needed to home one for life this honestly irks me.
 
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Oddball

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It's a double-edged sword. Yes, the species is on the endangered list. No, they can not be released back to the wild for fear of introducing non-indigenous diseases to wild populations.
There are no breeders in the US. So, where are they to be sent to? And, more importantly, who will pay for the transport?
 
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weston

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It's a double-edged sword. Yes, the species is on the endangered list. No, they can not be released back to the wild for fear of introducing non-indigenous diseases to wild populations.
There are no breeders in the US. So, where are they to be sent to? And, more importantly, who will pay for the transport?
Well what are all the fees they charge the previous owner going towards? Preservation? No well not here atleast, you said it yourself their are no breeding programs in the states idk it all just seems like a twisted way to control what we can and can't have while they make money either for no reason way.
 

Oddball

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They don't call it fees. They call it fines. Revenues from fines goes to the state. I'm fairly certain the state politicians don't care one bit about the final disposition of a bunch of confiscated smuggled fish.
 
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weston

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They don't call it fees. They call it fines. Revenues from fines goes to the state. I'm fairly certain the state politicians don't care one bit about the final disposition of a bunch of confiscated smuggled fish.
Your right I'm not arguing with you on that I just hate that the fish are punished for no reason they didn't choose to be smuggled into this country, especially when they could be used for something like breeding or even for cool exhibits/education being a rare fish and all..
 

Oddball

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There was a case where a judge asked a known fish society hobbyist to house a confiscated asian aro for the duration of the trial for the smuggler. After the trial, the judge offered the hobbyist court permission to keep the aro provided he obtain the required permit. The permit restrictions and costs, combined with the fact that the hobbyist could never breed the fish were cause for the hobbyist to turn down the court's offer. The fish was destroyed.
I'm trying to remember the hobbyist's name but, it's been 9-10 years. I think we have an article on the case floating around the site somewhere.
 

weston

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There was a case where a judge asked a known fish society hobbyist to house a confiscated asian aro for the duration of the trial for the smuggler. After the trial, the judge offered the hobbyist court permission to keep the aro provided he obtain the required permit. The permit restrictions and costs, combined with the fact that the hobbyist could never breed the fish were cause for the hobbyist to turn down the court's offer. The fish was destroyed.
I'm trying to remember the hobbyist's name but, it's been 9-10 years. I think we have an article on the case floating around the site somewhere.
Cool I'll keep my eyes out I'd like to read it, also I just saw an older post of yours I'm planning to comment on if you wouldn't mind answering a question I had that would be awesome.
 

jonah h2o

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it sounds like its not worth the risk, they're are plenty of other cool Arowana for now thought !!!!
 

jonah h2o

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why are they illegal? seems no different than a Jardini arowana to me but maybe I'm wrong I no nothing about asian arowana's.
 

Narwhal

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Asian Arowana, Scleropages formosus, are listed as endanged by the IUCN, and are listed under appendix 1 by CITES, which means they need special documentation to possess in signed countries (if you live in Andorra, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Federated States of Micronesia, Haiti, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, South Sudan, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Turkmenistan, or Tuvalu and can smuggle one in, CITIES can't do anything) The reason why you can't have them in the United States is the Endangered Species Act, which prohibits the possession, transportation, or propagation of listed species, except by Zoos and conservation programs. You cannot have one, the same way you can't own a California Condor. They are a foreign species, but that is in the Endangered Species Act to prevent Americans from buying Ivory, Tiger Skin rugs, or some rare parrot as a pet and so lead to extinctions. Should Asian Arowana be listed? probably not, people don't usually catch wild fish, they are from farms. Tigers, Rhinos, rare parrots, and elephants are not generally farmed as Asian Arowana are.
Jardini Arowana, Scleropages jardinii, Looks basically the same, as they are both members of Scleropages (remember the genus Canus, includes Dogs and Coyotes which are very common, and people usually don't care about shooting a coyote, but Canus also includes the Red and Ethiopian Wolf which are very rare, and would get a lot of attention if you shot), Jardini are not endangered, neither the IUCN or CITES even say they are threatened.
The other reason why captive bred Arowana should/cannot be returned to the wild is hobbyists like all the bright color morphs, that simply don't exist in wild populations, and would make wild fish especially fry susceptible to predation and so make them rarer. Most people want really bright fish that have been selectively bred like a Super Chili Red or Purple, or a deep Golden color. I myself really like wild type Super Reds, but that is my preference.
 
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