Cinder block stand

kzimmerman

Piranha
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Mar 18, 2009
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delmar md
I have a bunch of 2x4 stands, was looking for something a little different. The issue I have with going up to 4 is I’m afraid of the higher center of gravity vs the reduced stiffness in the block. Blocks are cheap, might just try it with a wiggle test to see how stiff it is with 4.
 

kzimmerman

Piranha
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Mar 18, 2009
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I didn’t know that about cinder blocks. Pretty cool. Yes, I’m using the slang term, I’m using modern blocks.
 
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RD.

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FYI….

 
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dmyersWv

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Dec 28, 2022
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I have and have used for years multiple block stands. Weight hasn't been an issue. Even multi level stands. Lots of youtube videos out there. Important to stack blocks with the hole up as used for walls. I place wood between the block and any tank. 1 by 8 for 125 and smaller leaves a space between boards for and pipes or electrical.
 
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jjohnwm

Redtail Catfish
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Mar 29, 2019
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...Important to stack blocks with the hole up as used for walls...
Not really. While it's true that aligning the blocks with the gaps vertical ensures the absolute maximum strength, it also makes for the absolute worst waste of space. From a practical standpoint, stacking the blocks with the gaps horizontal provides a number of small cubbyholes which can be useful for storage and for routing of hoses, airlines, wiring, etc.; the strength of the blocks is still so immense that it far exceeds anything you will need for mere aquarium use.

The structural engineer I mentioned earlier was adamant that a single block, or a single stack of them, would be more than capable of supporting the entire weight of the tank I was building entirely on its own...although of course the tank would have torn itself apart of its own weight if balanced on such a tiny support. For the OP, top the columns of concrete blocks with wood to support the bottom of the tank evenly; but orient the blocks any which way you want, it will never make any practical difference in terms of strength.
 
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dmyersWv

Plecostomus
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I believe you are right about the holes and load bearing, my uncle was a brick layer and would have a fit if the blocks weren't installed correctly.
 

fishguy1978

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Mar 30, 2020
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I only use the finest in cabinetry in my fish room. Especially with my 260, 220, 115, and 6ft 90. All are sitting on stacked block towers 3 high. The 90 only has two stacks set about a foot in from each end with two 2x6 72in long laying flat to support the tank. I have copious amounts of pictures of my Fish room on my thread. My 260 is acrylic and the 220 glass. I did the Sagulator calculations and yes my platforms are over built.
 
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dmyersWv

Plecostomus
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Great thing about block is how easy it is to change up. Costs are minimal. I've seen some painted and it looks really nice.
 
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dogofwar

Potamotrygon
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Jan 3, 2006
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No problem stacking 4 high with concrete blocks (AKA "cinder blocks"). A 125g is 18" wide and a brick is only 16, so I'd add a piece of plywood/styro on top of a single stack of blocks on each end (and probably in the middle)... and/or another staggered set of blocks under each corner
 

kzimmerman

Piranha
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Mar 18, 2009
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I’ve got pieces of 2x on top of the block. My concern with 4 high was stability. I’m using 2 columns set in a foot from the end. It’s a 125 turtle tank, so it doesn’t weigh that much.
 
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