Clown Loach breeding and export study

fishdance

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Yes. My word should be enough. It's good enough for me.

Im not even sure what you are reluctant to believe? Lots of breeding documentation only occurs when breeding is widespread practice.

It wasnt that difficult for me to be invited to a farm to watch and learn how they breed and raise clown loaches. The breeding part is the easiest portion like most fish production.
 

RD.

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This wasn’t a challenge, I don’t personally know you, nor you I. I was asking you to share in the interest of the forum, I thought that was the purpose of sites such as this, to share knowledge. No? I have always supported captive breeding programs, especially with this species so I was personally very interested to see photos of the farms set ups, along with more details. I guess that won’t be coming. Pity...
 
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andyroo

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When I was early-Grad-school ('06ish?) UMiami was working on CL breeding and apparently did crack the nut (with IP protections) with the intention of either providing hatchlings or facilitating Fla producers, though I don't know where that went. Knowing this, though, I've been disappointed at this thread's consensus that most/all clowns are wild sourced. My Karma feels fresher with Fishdance's news.
 

RD.

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The nut has been cracked for many years, there is nothing new regarding the breeding of clown loaches in captivity, and Florida was mentioned early on in this discussion. (2009 - Post #37 by Dkarc Dkarc )

But millions being bred in captivity, that's certainly new. I would still assume that the vast majority of clown loaches being exported in the trade, are wild caught.
 
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RD.

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From a paper published in Feb 2019.

CASE STUDY 3: OVERFISHING CLOWN LOACH CHROMOBOTIA MICRACANTHUS AND ALTERNATIVES


The clown loach C. macracanthus or tiger botia, is a well‐known tropical freshwater fish belonging to the Botiidae family. It originates from inland waters of Indonesia, on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo. It is a popular and familiar fish in the aquarium trade and is sold worldwide (Dudgeon, 2000). Traditionally, the most common collection technique involved using lengths of bamboo with openings cut into each segment (see Figure 4). These are normally weighted with stones to make them sink and hung from overhanging or marginal vegetation. The loaches take refuge in these at night and the fishermen return during the hours of darkness to collect them. Smaller specimens of 20–80 mm have been collected in this way for many decades, usually during January–March but numbers have fallen away sharply since the turn of the century. To satisfy demand in the ornamental fish industry, the out‐take in 1997 was 20 million juveniles (Ng & Tan, 1997). In 2009, that number had increased to 50 million (Legendre et al., 2012). Industry specialists note a persistent decrease in the number of juvenile fish caught using this method, albeit fished with increasing intensity for almost 30 years (Dudgeon, 2000). It became evidently clear that this species was overexploited and threatened and this prompted the Indonesian government in 2002 to forbid the export of fish > 15 cm, which are considered sexually mature. Given that annual catches of smaller fish have declined greatly, native fishermen in some areas have been forced to change their tactics in order to continue trading.

Figure 4

1583010381949.png



The ornamental fishery for clown loach in Sumatra: (a) Chromobotia macracanthus; (b)–(c) traditional capture method for using lengths of bamboo weighted with stones, and hung from overhanging vegetation, in which C. macracanthus take refuge at night, when (c) the fishermen return during the hours of darkness to collect them. (d) Fishermen from the Batang Hari river capturing C. macracanthus larvae at night for (e)–(f) on‐growing in simple aquaculture facilities

In nature, this species is a migratory spawner, moving from the main river channels into smaller tributaries and temporarily inundated flood plains during the rainy season. These movements usually begin in September with spawning typically occurring in late September–early October, though the timing of this is beginning to shift with the changing climate (Evers, 2009a). The eggs drift and come to settle in the riparian vegetation where the initially pelagic larvae spend their early days feeding on micro‐organisms. Some drift too far, enter the main rivers and are swept downstream and out to sea and hence are lost. However, native fishermen in the Batang Hari river system in Sumatra have come to take advantage of this phenomenon (Evers, 2009b). Local fishermen now collect the pelagic larvae that drift into the main river channel and grow them on to sell to middlemen or larger distributors (Figure 4). Perhaps as many as 10 million specimens are raised and shipped from the area in this way each year.


At one time all traded fish were wild‐collected, mostly from Sumatra, but these days the situation is less clear. While many thousands of wild specimens are still caught and sold annually, farmers in South‐east Asia have been artificially breeding the species with the use of hormones for several years (Legendre et al., 2012; Ng & Tan 1997). Hormones are used to stimulate oocyte maturation and ovulation (Legendre et al., 2012). More recently breeders from the Czech Republic, Russia and other parts of Eastern Europe have perfected a similar technique, which has seen the price of the once‐expensive captive‐bred fish drop considerably.
 
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David R

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Im not even sure what you are reluctant to believe?
Its easy to be sceptical when you're interested enough to come here and make a post claiming you've bred them yourself, but not interested enough to provide any sort of evidence, even a basic photo of your set-up. I have no reason to doubt you, but I have no reason to believe you either. It's the internet in 2020, does anyone just take peoples word for at face-value any more?
 
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