Clown Loach breeding and export study

ewurm

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its_an_obsession;2236420; said:
so when my lfs is advertising a breeding pair of clown loaches... they are full of ****?
Totally. 100%
 

ewurm

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Great Clown Loach article. Features a loach pattern diagram and also details Clown Loachs that are native to Kalimantan, an area in Indonesia that also has Clown Loaches, but they are rarely exported. Good read.

http://www.sydneycichlid.com/clown-loach.htm
 

ewurm

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ewurm;2228563; said:
This is the story of a Russian who successfully bred his Clown Loaches artificially. He used hormone injections. It's the only picture I have ever seen of tank raised fry. I have heard many stories of Asian fish farms breeding them this way. I have never seen any articles detailing the methods of these farms. I believe they are doing it, I just don't see any information out there that describes or substantiates the claim. Some claim that the majority of clown loaches for sale right now are hormone bred, but there isn't any information to support the claim and if there is, I would like to see it. It is my belief that a significant portion of the clown loaches for sale are wild caught in Borneo. The Sumatran clown loaches are also available, but most of the fish I see have the black marks on the pelvic fins suggesting their origins are from Borneo. The Sumatran Clown Loaches have completely red pelvic fins and are less common, at least in my area.




http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/pfk/pages/item.php?news=1633
Another interesting point on the article above is that this man did not have a successful spawn. He treated with hormones, then stripped the eggs and the milt. He aquacultured the fry.
 

ewurm

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I've found info leading me to believe that the University of Florida was creating a Clown Loach production facility within their aquaculture department. I sent them an email to see if it is true and if they had any success.
 

le patron

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ewurm;2634367; said:
I've found info leading me to believe that the University of Florida was creating a Clown Loach production facility within their aquaculture department. I sent them an email to see if it is true and if they had any success.
nice, lets us know what they tell you
 

Dkarc

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ewurm;2634367; said:
I've found info leading me to believe that the University of Florida was creating a Clown Loach production facility within their aquaculture department. I sent them an email to see if it is true and if they had any success.
Yes, it is 100% true. Down at the UF Tropical Aquaculture Lab they have bred and successfully raised clown loaches. They did it several years ago if I remember right. I will ask Scott, the farm manager down there this week when im there. The UF Lab itself is not a full scale production facility (was an old fish farm with 50+ ponds + facilities) but rather a research facility. They breed and raise fish that have never been bred before in the US on any appreciable commercial scale in an attempt to cut back on our need to import fish (wild or tank raised). Once they figure out how to do it and "close the life cycle of the fish" they take the info and pass it onto the local fish farmers so they can begin production. Biggest set back with the clown loaches as many of you know is that it takes YEARS for them to become sexually mature. So I would expect within a few years to see US tank bred clown loaches in your LFS.

-Ryan
 

ewurm

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Dkarc;2634448; said:
Yes, it is 100% true. Down at the UF Tropical Aquaculture Lab they have bred and successfully raised clown loaches. They did it several years ago if I remember right. I will ask Scott, the farm manager down there this week when im there. The UF Lab itself is not a full scale production facility (was an old fish farm with 50+ ponds + facilities) but rather a research facility. They breed and raise fish that have never been bred before in the US on any appreciable commercial scale in an attempt to cut back on our need to import fish (wild or tank raised). Once they figure out how to do it and "close the life cycle of the fish" they take the info and pass it onto the local fish farmers so they can begin production. Biggest set back with the clown loaches as many of you know is that it takes YEARS for them to become sexually mature. So I would expect within a few years to see US tank bred clown loaches in your LFS.

-Ryan

Thanks for the info! I am assuming that they are using hormone injection as a method, but my question is are they inducing actual spawning or stripping the fish? I'm going to try and establish a dialogue with someone down there that can update on the progress and methods.
 

Dkarc

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Yes, it was all hormone injection induced spawning. As far as if they strip spawned them or let nature take its course....I am unsure. I am wanting to say they let them spawn on their own, but dont quote me one that. Like I said, i'll try to get more info from Scott when im down there on Tuesday.

-Ryan
 

RD.

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Indonesia has imposed a ban on the export of specimens larger than 10 cm in length to protect breeding adults, but also quite consciously to impede captive breeding programs.
While this may apply to Indonesia, it does not apply to other countries if/when larger loaches are collected. If there is a demand, these loaches can & do get sold, and exported out of Asia. Just recently an associate of mine who has business ties in Singapore was sent a list from one of the tropical fish farms that had approx 50 clown loaches in the 10 inch range for sale. Within 4-5 hrs approx half of them were already sold.
While loaches this size may not be common, they do surface, and they do get sold in the trade.
 
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