NEVER release an aquarium fish into the wild.

TwoHedWlf

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My fish trap catches jewel cichlids in the local creek. That is not what I am targeting, I have been throwing them back in, perhaps I should toss them on the bank to perish? Does not seem that would even put a dent in their numbers.
Here at least it's illegal to release any of the official invasive fish back into the water.
 
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Tim the fish

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Introducing an aquarium fish to the wild, wether native or non-native is a cardinal sin for a fishkeeper. Even wild caught native fish can pick up non-native disease in your tank that you could be unleashing upon the native ecological system. A non-native introduction is even worse. Non-native species compete with native fish for food and habitat, eat native fish eggs, and even destroy habitat all together. Non-native species that have caused significant problems include many species of carp, zebra mussels, the round goby, the spiny water flea, and species of snakeheads just to name a few. The introduction of snakeheads to native waters has caused the ban of ALL species of Channa to be banned from the United States. These beautiful monsters are no longer allowed to be kept in aquariums. There is also a sustained population of goldfish in the mississippi river and although they don't cause much of a problem, they give DNR officials ammo in trying to ban more species of fish that you and I keep. NEVER RELEASE YOUR FISH OR INVERTEBRATES INTO THE WILD. I hate to say it but euthanizing your fish is actually a better option than letting them go. I choose neither. If there is a fish I absolutely cannot keep anymore, I sell it or give it to another fish keeper that will provide a good home. I hope you will do the same.
I agree. Look at the problems released lion fish has caused. You should always research a fish before purchasing it to make sure you can provide the right environment for it. I am sure that is why some fish are illegal to have in some states. Someone had realeased something into the eniroment an it has wrecked havic. Look at the problems realeased snake heads have caused.
 
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Deadliestviper7

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I agree. Look at the problems released lion fish has caused. You should always research a fish before purchasing it to make sure you can provide the right environment for it. I am sure that is why some fish are illegal to have in some states. Someone had realeased something into the eniroment an it has wrecked havic. Look at the problems realeased snake heads have caused.
The problems released snakeheads have caused are mostly in the human minds, studies in Florida show they fit in well with native gamefish,and don't seem to outcompete largemouth bass or other native gamefishes.
 

___James___

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I agree. I’ve always wanted a snakehead but due to irresponsible fishkeepers they are illegal. If you can’t keep your fish anymore sell it, give it away, or euthanize it.
 
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J. H.

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The problems released snakeheads have caused are mostly in the human minds, studies in Florida show they fit in well with native gamefish,and don't seem to outcompete largemouth bass or other native gamefishes.
Maybe in Florida. Here in NY, while they are outcompeted and killed by our native bowfins, if put into a system where the bowfins have been fished to extinction, it will result in the complete collapse of the system as the worthless sankeheads eat everything else.
 

Deadliestviper7

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Maybe in Florida. Here in NY, while they are outcompeted and killed by our native bowfins, if put into a system where the bowfins have been fished to extinction, it will result in the complete collapse of the system as the worthless sankeheads eat everything else.
I've only heard of that happening in small ponds, do you have any instances of this happening on a larger scale?
 

J. H.

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I've only heard of that happening in small ponds, do you have any instances of this happening on a larger scale?
Sorry for the delayed response. I can't seem to find mention of large scale damage besides that they outcompete bass according toUSGS. I know they have destroyed lakes and streams in southern New York as well.
 
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Deadliestviper7

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Sorry for the delayed response. I can't seem to find mention of large scale damage besides that they outcompete bass according toUSGS. I know they have destroyed lakes and streams in southern New York as well.
The claims that they outcompete bass is false and unsubstantiated
 
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Mark K

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My fish trap catches jewel cichlids in the local creek. That is not what I am targeting, I have been throwing them back in, perhaps I should toss them on the bank to perish? Does not seem that would even put a dent in their numbers.
I plan to go to FL to fish the Keys and then fish for cichlids. I would love to find jewel cichlids to take home.
 
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