Saltwater pond?

spencer0t

Jack Dempsey
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Dec 18, 2016
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Was feeding my fish at my other ponds and thought about building a saltwater pond is then even possible to do outdoors?
 
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The Masked Shadow

Redtail Catfish
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Jul 19, 2020
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Nick Bingo did it, but He is a butthole, and doesn't care about his fish. I think it could work if you take some precautions, such as the ammount of salt evaporating with the water, and the filter size. Indoors would be better. You could do native fish to my home, california. Round Ray, maybe surf perch.
 

Deadeye

Goliath Tigerfish
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Aug 31, 2020
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Completely possible, just make sure that nothing from outside the pond gets in it. Salt would be the most important to control. Much more maintenance than any reef. I recommend passing on coral and getting fish that are highly tolerant to dirty water or shifts in salinity (damsels for example).
Brackish would actually be neat, as life there is adapted for large shifts in water parameters that would come in a pond.
 

FLA

Piranha
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Feb 1, 2017
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Doable, yes. Worth the hassle the jury is out on that. Almost everyone thinks about evaporation. Fewer think of salinity when it is raining. This and algae control are two reasons I wouldn't even think about doing this without some sort of cover. I agree brackish fish are your best bet as they can handle some of the swings you will have. Another thing to think of is where are you going to dump your wastewater. Temp is the other thing to think about, but you are probably way ahead of me on that. That is a lot of salt to put in your yard.

I have done large open top (pond style) tanks in greenhouses and that is a completely different world. You can control humidity and therefore reduce evaporation. Temps are easier to control and you don't have to worry about contamination. Growing corals with sunlight is much easier than messing with lights. It is a lot of fun to see your fish cruising around in an open top tank with several feet to go before they have to turn. I highly recommend the experience if you are willing to set it up right from the beginning. I would not have the patience for an open marine pond in the back yard, but a greenhouse with a tank is a different conversation all together. If I were going to do it again I would want to try mudskippers in an 8x8 or 10x10 tank. I have always wanted to see if they would spawn in such a setup.
 

prokeeper

Feeder Fish
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Mar 23, 2021
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It is possible but depends if it’s really hot where you live and to much water evaporates and also the temperature and don’t get any corals if it’s an outdoor pond
 
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Deadeye

Goliath Tigerfish
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As water evaporates, freshwater can be added to keep salinity in check. You would have to add salt after rains, however, as that would dilute the salt.
 
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spencer0t

Jack Dempsey
MFK Member
Dec 18, 2016
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Seems that evaporation could be a big problem in the Florida summer months with the heat, I wouldn’t be able to have 24 hour surveillance on the pond. But still a interesting idea I’ll sit on the idea and see if I can find a solution thanks for everyone’s input!
 
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krichardson

Bronze Tier VIP
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Jun 19, 2006
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Nick Bingo did it, but He is a butthole, and doesn't care about his fish. I think it could work if you take some precautions, such as the ammount of salt evaporating with the water, and the filter size. Indoors would be better. You could do native fish to my home, california. Round Ray, maybe surf perch.
I've never heard of that Nick Bingo fella and your description of him causes me to not want to look him up lol.....anyhow, if I remember correctly the salt mix does evaporate with the water, it remains in the tank.
 
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