Saltwater pond?

Deadeye

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I've never heard of that Nick Bingo fella and your description of him causes me to not want to look him up lol.....anyhow, if I remember correctly the salt mix does evaporate with the water, it remains in the tank.
Yes that’s true. That’s why when a marine tank drops level you can fill it back up with fresh water.
 
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krichardson

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Yes that’s true. That’s why when a marine tank drops level you can fill it back up with fresh water.
Yeah,and I'll admit that I've actually thought of trying a saltwater pond back when I was into marine fishes.
 

djsaltynuts

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Was feeding my fish at my other ponds and thought about building a saltwater pond is then even possible to do outdoors?
maybe with lion fish or brackish fish so you can combat changing salinity due to large amounts of evaporation or just build an automated top off.
 
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Livingrock

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Like others have said, it's doable, but I feel like a lot of times once fish keepers with tanks start thinking about ponds, for some reason, a lot of the things they know and use in tank-keeping is forgotten about entirely and it's like they're starting over from scratch. That video last page, for example. If you showed that much algae in a saltwater tank, at least 5 or 6 people would have posted about macroalgae already, or grazing fish, and nobody here has mentioned it. You can fix a lot of your pond problems with the same solutions you'd use in a tank.

First of all, earlier posters are right about using brackish fish. Most marine fish head to deeper waters in winter, they don't stick around for cold temps. Brackish fish can handle rain and cold a lot better. If you have a sizeable pond, look up "aquaculture" fish instead of "aquarium" fish. You can raise pompano in earthen ponds in FL. Just an idea.

Second, look to freshwater pond advice for solutions. If you are in a tropical climate, you will need about 75% of the surface of your pond shaded to avoid algae problems. Temperate this decreases to around 50%, and down to 25% in areas with substantial winters/short daylight hours.

You can only stock a saltwater pond with about 25% of the bioload a freshwater pond can handle.

Growing algae on purpose can starve out the algae you don't want. Similar to a bog in a freshwater pond, or a sump tank in a saltwater tank.
 

twentyleagues

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I've never heard of that Nick Bingo fella and your description of him causes me to not want to look him up lol.....anyhow, if I remember correctly the salt mix does evaporate with the water, it remains in the tank.
I'm glad someone finally addressed this. Although I think you meant to say doesn't evaporate. Salt stays in the water. Deadeye Deadeye addressed this issue with an ato. Temp and temp flucuations is also an issue as is undesirable algae both of which can be addressed like F FLA stated. A separate pond with fast growing macros would help as would cover. If in a climate that stays warm 70°f + most species of fish and corals should be good (except maybe the most fragile of fish or coral). The biggest issue would be rain lowering salinity. I've been to coral "farms" in green houses and the corals are very vibrant, of coarse they were supplamented with halide lighting when needed. The corals were kept in large ponds made of wood and pond liners a couple were fiberglass pools, they also bred some cat sharks. So obviously the rain.... actually all these issues are handled with the greenhouse. It would be a huge undertaking but if many of the variables are handled properly not impossible.
 

krichardson

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I'm glad someone finally addressed this. Although I think you meant to say doesn't evaporate. Salt stays in the water. Deadeye Deadeye addressed this issue with an ato. Temp and temp flucuations is also an issue as is undesirable algae both of which can be addressed like F FLA stated. A separate pond with fast growing macros would help as would cover. If in a climate that stays warm 70°f + most species of fish and corals should be good (except maybe the most fragile of fish or coral). The biggest issue would be rain lowering salinity. I've been to coral "farms" in green houses and the corals are very vibrant, of coarse they were supplamented with halide lighting when needed. The corals were kept in large ponds made of wood and pond liners a couple were fiberglass pools, they also bred some cat sharks. So obviously the rain.... actually all these issues are handled with the greenhouse. It would be a huge undertaking but if many of the variables are handled properly not impossible.
I left out the word "not",thanks for pointing that out.I would not have noticed otherwise.
 

The Masked Shadow

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Huh. I assumed salt evaporates from the water. I was going to say, couldn't you just put an onning over it, or greenhouse, but already stated. If anyone could do this, that would be pretty cool!
 

krichardson

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Nope the salt stays but I supppose an awning would address the issue of rainwater though.
 
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Damascus

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Huh. I assumed salt evaporates from the water. I was going to say, couldn't you just put an onning over it, or greenhouse, but already stated. If anyone could do this, that would be pretty cool!
Not really outside if its in a greenhouse...
 
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