Two tanks, one sump.

MrsE88

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I know this can be done, but how is the best way to go about it?

Info about tanks: Two 125g on a dual stand. Neither tank is drilled. These will each hold 4 koi for the winter, so maximum filtration and bio is a must. Next year the koi will be too big for the tanks and I still plan on making a pond for them in the basement. At that point these tanks will be used for other fish I’m sure. So I’ll want a setup that can be permanent.
This is the picture from the seller I got the tanks from. 57B213E6-A6A3-431E-AB3B-6C94098BB494.jpeg

I do not want to drill the tanks. So I’ll need to make overflows for them.
Thinking about it now.... I’m not sure how that will work for the bottom tank.
My initial thought was to make a sump with a big garbage can. But now I don’t know if that will work. Would a tank on the floor next to the stand be a better option? Will that even work with the tank on the bottom of the stand?

I’d love any and all ideas on how to filter these tanks on one system.
 
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Rocksor

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Seems easier just to put multiple HOBs for each one like 4 x AC110 or equivalent plus 2 x extra large sponge filters. I thinking the AC would be used to change the mechanical filtration. AC110 too expensive, then just up the quantity of sponge filters.
 

TheWolfman

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Since you don’t want to drill them I would consider a overhead sumps. I’m not sure you could pull it off with two tanks though since the pumps would need to be moving the same amount of water and the lower tank would be moving less water ( you run the risk of draining the one tank). I would just build two separate sumps. The other option would be to just drill both tanks, it’s not as hard as you think. You would need to build a second stand so you could actually pull it off.
 

MrsE88

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Seems easier just to put multiple HOBs for each one like 4 x AC110 or equivalent plus 2 x extra large sponge filters. I thinking the AC would be used to change the mechanical filtration. AC110 too expensive, then just up the quantity of sponge filters.
Yes, that would be easier. I just like sumps better. I have such horrible issues with hob filters. And canisters are just seem like a waste when I have more then enough room for a sump. I’ve never used sponge filters before.


Since you don’t want to drill them I would consider a overhead sumps. I’m not sure you could pull it off with two tanks though since the pumps would need to be moving the same amount of water and the lower tank would be moving less water ( you run the risk of draining the one tank). I would just build two separate sumps. The other option would be to just drill both tanks, it’s not as hard as you think. You would need to build a second stand so you could actually pull it off.
Hmmm... I hadn’t thought about the Water flow being different.
I’m sure drilling them wouldn’t be hard, I’d just rather not.
After posting I did think about making a second stand and just running sumps under each. I was just hoping to keep the setup as is, and maybe cut back on how much equipment I’d need to be running. One of the other reasons why I want to avoid hob filters.
 
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fishhead0103666

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I believe duanes duanes ran multiple tanks off a single sump, if that is true then he should be able to help.
 
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TheWolfman

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Hmmm... I hadn’t thought about the Water flow being different.
I’m sure drilling them wouldn’t be hard, I’d just rather not.
After posting I did think about making a second stand and just running sumps under each. I was just hoping to keep the setup as is, and maybe cut back on how much equipment I’d need to be running. One of the other reasons why I want to avoid hob filters.
If you make another stand, and drill both tanks you can pull off one sump. I would avoid using hob overflows as it’s a disaster waiting to happen. But there two options you could “rack” the two 125’s and run the top tank through the bottom then to the sump. The other option is to run them side by side with over head sumps with the return pumps in each aquarium.
 

duanes

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I usually would run 4 to 5 tanks to a sump, you just run overflow lines from each tank to the sump, and pump it it back. I usually have one heavy duty pump, and split the main line into as many outflows as I need.


on the one directly above, the sump is lower middle feeding at least 3 tanks.
They Tanks can be on opposite walls.

or under stairways, to hide the ugly ones
I used this barrel sumps, under a basement stairway.

and sumps don't need to be firectly below the tank, they can be offset to make maintenance easy, like the one below totally open for maintenance sake, and a large bio-tower..
 

MrsE88

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If you make another stand, and drill both tanks you can pull off one sump. I would avoid using hob overflows as it’s a disaster waiting to happen. But there two options you could “rack” the two 125’s and run the top tank through the bottom then to the sump. The other option is to run them side by side with over head sumps with the return pumps in each aquarium.
I don’t think hob overflows should be a problem as long as I don’t keep plants in the tanks. Nothing else could clog it.
Running the tanks top into bottom- into sump is an interesting idea. Seems a little finicky, but interesting.

I usually would run 4 to 5 tanks to a sump, you just run overflow lines from each tank to the sump, and pump it it back. I usually have one heavy duty pump, and split the main line into as many outflows as I need.


on the one directly above, the sump is lower middle feeding at least 3 tanks.
They Tanks can be on opposite walls.

or under stairways, to hide the ugly ones
I used this barrel sumps, under a basement stairway.

and sumps don't need to be firectly below the tank, they can be offset to make maintenance easy, like the one below totally open for maintenance sake, and a large bio-tower..
Thank you for chiming in! Do you happen to remember what gph the pump was that you used?
I wonder if it would be possible to cut the existing stand in half, frame the bottom of both halves, and stick a sump in the middle between them.
(Tank 1) sump (tank 2)
 

twentyleagues

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I have 4 tanks currently running off 1 sump also. Its easier if the sump is the lowest point so the 125 on the bottom would need to move and the sump could go there. I'd not do it without drilling them. I have a hammerhead running my system but it has to pump all the way from the basement to the upstairs.
You could drill both tanks and have the sump on the floor next to the tanks feed the top tank with a pump have it drain to the bottom tank and the bottom tank empties in the sump.
 
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twentyleagues

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Flint town!
Also hang on back overflows are the devil! Lol
Sry TheWolfman TheWolfman I blew right past your post and posted the same damn thing. I hate when that happens to me so sorry brother. But at least someone else believes as you do, good idea!
 
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