Breeding worms in an aquarium?

Rob909

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I’m wondering if there are any worms I can breed in a freshwater tank that my fish can feed off of?
I intend to set up a stock of fish that constantly forage through the sand for food: geophagus, clown loaches, and eventually, a freshwater dolphin fish.
Reading that these dolphins don’t take to pellets, I’m considering the option of breeding worms in the sand that all the fish can eat as they emerge.
Anything come to mind??
 
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tlindsey

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I’m wondering if there are any worms I can breed in a freshwater tank that my fish can feed off of?
I intend to set up a stock of fish that constantly forage through the sand for food: geophagus, clown loaches, and eventually, a freshwater dolphin fish.
Reading that these dolphins don’t take to pellets, I’m considering the option of breeding worms in the sand that all the fish can eat as they emerge.
Anything come to mind??

You could culture detritus worms in a separate container small aquarium but they are very small. I don't remember the members name but he culture's detritus worms.
 
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Rob909

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You could culture detritus worms in a separate container small aquarium but they are very small. I don't remember the members name but he culture's detritus worms.
I’d like to culture something in the display or sump if I can. Inside a sand substrate so the fish can graze on the worms. Self-sustaining food source.
 

esoxlucius

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Detritus worms are extremely easy to cultivate but the conditions they thrive in are not good conditions for fish, so, as already mentioned you'd need to do it in a seperate tank. They are also really tiny, seems like more hassle than what it's worth. And anyway, there's a chance you'd end up with planaria too, which can be harmful to fish if they find their way into their gills.

Worms are a regular part of my fishes diet. But I have a compost heap at the bottom of my garden where I can literally collect dozens of them in less than a minute. These type of worms, unlike detritus worms, are huge in comparison, full of goodness, and fish love them.

This might be the best way forward for you worm wise, I certainly haven't heard of anyone cultivating good sized worms in the actual display tank/sump that fish can graze on at their leisure.
 
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Rob909

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Detritus worms are extremely easy to cultivate but the conditions they thrive in are not good conditions for fish, so, as already mentioned you'd need to do it in a seperate tank. They are also really tiny, seems like more hassle than what it's worth. And anyway, there's a chance you'd end up with planaria too, which can be harmful to fish if they find their way into their gills.

Worms are a regular part of my fishes diet. But I have a compost heap at the bottom of my garden where I can literally collect dozens of them in less than a minute. These type of worms, unlike detritus worms, are huge in comparison, full of goodness, and fish love them.

This might be the best way forward for you worm wise, I certainly haven't heard of anyone cultivating good sized worms in the actual display tank/sump that fish can graze on at their leisure.
Okay good suggestion. I was also concerned with detritus worms requiring more detritus than my fish would be able to handle.

An outdoor compost would be an amazing idea but we spray outside for insects and even if the worms survived, I wouldn’t want to introduce that into the tank.
I know I’m being picky here but I really wouldn’t want to set up a compost bit inside the house or garage due to smells.
Maybe the idea I’m going for is just too good to be true without additional maintenance and setups lol.
 

esoxlucius

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Okay good suggestion. I was also concerned with detritus worms requiring more detritus than my fish would be able to handle.

An outdoor compost would be an amazing idea but we spray outside for insects and even if the worms survived, I wouldn’t want to introduce that into the tank.
I know I’m being picky here but I really wouldn’t want to set up a compost bit inside the house or garage due to smells.
Maybe the idea I’m going for is just too good to be true without additional maintenance and setups lol.
Yeah, you don't want to be feeding worms to fish that have come from an area of land that gets sprayed with chemicals.

Just for your information, why don't you look into breeding copepods or white worms. There's loads of info on line. It wouldn't surprise me if members on here are already doing it. Copepods are tiny crustaceans which can be bred in a sump I believe, there are both freshwater and salt water varieties. White worms can be bred in small containers and from tutorials that I have seen on line, many many thousands of these worms can be bred. I think guys who do a lot of breeding use these worms because they are excellent for fry and juvenile fish.

Have a look into it, give you something to think about.
 
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Rob909

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Yeah, you don't want to be feeding worms to fish that have come from an area of land that gets sprayed with chemicals.

Just for your information, why don't you look into breeding copepods or white worms. There's loads of info on line. It wouldn't surprise me if members on here are already doing it. Copepods are tiny crustaceans which can be bred in a sump I believe, there are both freshwater and salt water varieties. White worms can be bred in small containers and from tutorials that I have seen on line, many many thousands of these worms can be bred. I think guys who do a lot of breeding use these worms because they are excellent for fry and juvenile fish.

Have a look into it, give you something to think about.
I’ll do some research and see if I can get my hands on the freshwater variety of copepods. I had a pretty good colony going when I had my saltwater tanks.

White worms may be something to look into as well.
 

BichirKing

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I started a 5 gallon bucket worm farm to feed my fish and axolotls. I can control what they eat and no chemicals. plus the garden gets excellent fertilizer.
 
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Rob909

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I started a 5 gallon bucket worm farm to feed my fish and axolotls. I can control what they eat and no chemicals. plus the garden gets excellent fertilizer.
Great link! How’s the smell on this kind of setup? My fire eel loves earth worms so this could be a good option.
 
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