Photographing your fish

beblondie

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1) Before you attempt taking pictures clean the glass inside and out
2.)take the pictures at night with all light sources off except the tank
3.)get as much light as you can into the tank add lighting if you can
4.)use the fastest speed your camera has
5.)NO FLASHES it washes out the fishes color.If you can't control the flash put a piece of masking tape over it to diffuse the bright flash.
6.)Press the shutter button half-way down to focus, than all the way down to take the picture. thank you vanimate for this one.
7.)Do not use digital zoom, only optical zoom for really clear pictures
8.)shoot from a tripod
9.)A remote shutter release(if possible for your camera)is best because sometimes presing the shutter can shake the camera
10.)give the camera time to auto-focus... do not rush pictures
11.)let the fish come into your view of the camera,don't chase it down
12.) Plenty of light: The more the better, no matter those are tank lights or top-down flash light. Lighting is the key toward good aquarium photography (actually, apply to all photography cases).
13.) Faster shutter speed: 1/100s and faster is safer, and 1/200s is nearly OK for turning around arrows
14.) Smaller aperture size (the larger number): 11 or above (the smaller aperture the larger depth of field).
15.) Top-down external flash light on tank top is good (studio flash light is even better), built-in flash light is not good.
16.) Be patient, and spend more time (you'll get reward).
I mostly use 1/200s~1/250s, F16~22 for aquarium photography (I do setup plenty of lights for the tank)

Any more tips or hints please add them
 

rallysman

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Awesome tips for a point and shoot. Things are a bit different for a DSLR (especially if you have an external flash).

1) Before you attempt taking pictures clean the glass inside and out
2.)take the pictures at night with all light sources off except the tank
3.)get as much light as you can into the tank add lighting if you can. If you have an external flash, diffuse it with a Styrofoam box (on top of the tank) that's as long or longer than your arowana.
4.)use the fastest shutter @ ISO 400 or lower that shows the fish well
5.)NO on camera FLASHES it washes out the fishes color. If your camera requires you to trigger the external flash with the on board flash, use foil to reflect the flash away from the front of the tank.
6.)Press the shutter button half-way down to focus, then all the way down to take the picture. thank you vanimate for this one.
7.)Do not use digital zoom, only optical zoom for really clear pictures
8.)tripods are not necessary (only cumbersome) with any camera using external flash.
9.)A remote shutter release(if possible for your camera)is best because sometimes your fish will act more naturally without you in front of the tank.
10.)give the camera time to auto-focus... do not rush pictures
11.)pan with the fish, but wait for it to get under the flash.
12.) Plenty of light: The more the better, no matter those are tank lights or top-down flash light. Lighting is the key toward good aquarium photography (actually, apply to all photography cases). bingo- nothing ads more light than flash
13.) Faster shutter speed. The faster the better. If you have to drop below 1/125 of a second, consider raising ISO (which will add noise) or lowering aperture (F number) which will reduce depth of field. Always try to keep your shutter speed 2x your focal length.
14.) Smaller aperture size (the larger number): 11 or above (the smaller aperture the larger depth of field). If all else fails, lower aperture number (open aperture) to allow for more light. This can be adjusted if you'd like to have a small area in focus. The F number is inversely proportional to the size of the aperture.
15.) Top-down external flash light on tank top is good (studio flash light is even better), built-in flash light is not good.
16.) Be patient, and spend more time (you'll get reward).

Here is a quick example and the specs that go with it.


Aperture Value f/16
Exposure Bias Value 0 EV
Exposure Program Manual
Flash Flash, Auto-Mode, Return light detected
Focal Length 20 mm
Metering Mode Spot
Shutter Speed Value 1/500 second
The best way to learn is to try each setting and take note of what it does. once you learn how the settings effect each other it makes the pictures better.

The above picture was taken with a Nikon D50, but here is one that was taken with a point and shoot (Kodak DX7590).



Lots of practice and a bit of luck will help you produce awesome images.
 
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Red tail catking

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This is starting to sound like it would make a good sticky me and many others could review to this thread anytime they plan on taking a pic.
 

Kenfish

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rallysman;2931944;2931944 said:
Awesome tips for a point and shoot. Things are a bit different for a DSLR (especially if you have an external flash).

1) Before you attempt taking pictures clean the glass inside and out
2.)take the pictures at night with all light sources off except the tank
3.)get as much light as you can into the tank add lighting if you can. If you have an external flash, diffuse it with a Styrofoam box (on top of the tank) that's as long or longer than your arowana.
4.)use the fastest shutter @ ISO 400 or lower that shows the fish well
5.)NO on camera FLASHES it washes out the fishes color. If your camera requires you to trigger the external flash with the on board flash, use foil to reflect the flash away from the front of the tank.
6.)Press the shutter button half-way down to focus, then all the way down to take the picture. thank you vanimate for this one.
7.)Do not use digital zoom, only optical zoom for really clear pictures
8.)tripods are not necessary (only cumbersome) with any camera using external flash.
9.)A remote shutter release(if possible for your camera)is best because sometimes your fish will act more naturally without you in front of the tank.
10.)give the camera time to auto-focus... do not rush pictures
11.)pan with the fish, but wait for it to get under the flash.
12.) Plenty of light: The more the better, no matter those are tank lights or top-down flash light. Lighting is the key toward good aquarium photography (actually, apply to all photography cases). bingo- nothing ads more light than flash
13.) Faster shutter speed. The faster the better. If you have to drop below 1/125 of a second, consider raising ISO (which will add noise) or lowering aperture (F number) which will reduce depth of field. Always try to keep your shutter speed 2x your focal length.
14.) Smaller aperture size (the larger number): 11 or above (the smaller aperture the larger depth of field). If all else fails, lower aperture number (open aperture) to allow for more light. This can be adjusted if you'd like to have a small area in focus. The F number is inversely proportional to the size of the aperture.
15.) Top-down external flash light on tank top is good (studio flash light is even better), built-in flash light is not good.
16.) Be patient, and spend more time (you'll get reward).

Here is a quick example and the specs that go with it.


Aperture Value f/16
Exposure Bias Value 0 EV
Exposure Program Manual
Flash Flash, Auto-Mode, Return light detected
Focal Length 20 mm
Metering Mode Spot
Shutter Speed Value 1/500 second
The best way to learn is to try each setting and take note of what it does. once you learn how the settings effect each other it makes the pictures better.

The above picture was taken with a Nikon D50, but here is one that was taken with a point and shoot (Kodak DX7590).



Lots of practice and a bit of luck will help you produce awesome images.
Nice pics. Great example - I need to try more because most of my fish pictures look terrible. Thanks for the tip.
 

badreverend

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Red tail catking;2932356; said:
This is starting to sound like it would make a good sticky me and many others could review to this thread anytime they plan on taking a pic.
I wholeheartedly agree- especially in a forum that has such active, pain in the neck to photograph fish like the aros
 
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Bartek

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rallysman;2931944; said:
Awesome tips for a point and shoot. Things are a bit different for a DSLR (especially if you have an external flash).

1) Before you attempt taking pictures clean the glass inside and out
2.)take the pictures at night with all light sources off except the tank
3.)get as much light as you can into the tank add lighting if you can. If you have an external flash, diffuse it with a Styrofoam box (on top of the tank) that's as long or longer than your arowana.
4.)use the fastest shutter @ ISO 400 or lower that shows the fish well
5.)NO on camera FLASHES it washes out the fishes color. If your camera requires you to trigger the external flash with the on board flash, use foil to reflect the flash away from the front of the tank.
6.)Press the shutter button half-way down to focus, then all the way down to take the picture. thank you vanimate for this one.
7.)Do not use digital zoom, only optical zoom for really clear pictures
8.)tripods are not necessary (only cumbersome) with any camera using external flash.
9.)A remote shutter release(if possible for your camera)is best because sometimes your fish will act more naturally without you in front of the tank.
10.)give the camera time to auto-focus... do not rush pictures
11.)pan with the fish, but wait for it to get under the flash.
12.) Plenty of light: The more the better, no matter those are tank lights or top-down flash light. Lighting is the key toward good aquarium photography (actually, apply to all photography cases). bingo- nothing ads more light than flash
13.) Faster shutter speed. The faster the better. If you have to drop below 1/125 of a second, consider raising ISO (which will add noise) or lowering aperture (F number) which will reduce depth of field. Always try to keep your shutter speed 2x your focal length.
14.) Smaller aperture size (the larger number): 11 or above (the smaller aperture the larger depth of field). If all else fails, lower aperture number (open aperture) to allow for more light. This can be adjusted if you'd like to have a small area in focus. The F number is inversely proportional to the size of the aperture.
15.) Top-down external flash light on tank top is good (studio flash light is even better), built-in flash light is not good.
16.) Be patient, and spend more time (you'll get reward).

Here is a quick example and the specs that go with it.


Aperture Value f/16
Exposure Bias Value 0 EV
Exposure Program Manual
Flash Flash, Auto-Mode, Return light detected
Focal Length 20 mm
Metering Mode Spot
Shutter Speed Value 1/500 second
The best way to learn is to try each setting and take note of what it does. once you learn how the settings effect each other it makes the pictures better.

The above picture was taken with a Nikon D50, but here is one that was taken with a point and shoot (Kodak DX7590).



Lots of practice and a bit of luck will help you produce awesome images.
that picture with Arowana it's so nice that I have set it as my desktop...
great info on taking pictures.
 

oniomania

Gambusia
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Jul 4, 2006
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well , i have sony cyber-shot DSC-S90 and when i turn the flash off
fishes locks like shades because they're moving
so i can't takes a clear picture without flash , any ideas ??
 
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