Suitable saltwater sharks?

Toni™

Feeder Fish
Original poster
Aug 29, 2019
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I have been very interested in a shark tank or pool for my home for a long time but I am unsure which shark is most suitable, I am aware there are smaller bottom dwelling sharks but I'm more interested in sharks like the blacktip reef shark for example. Expenses and space isn't a problem and I'm in no rush so I have plenty of time to further educate myself on the needs of these creatures, the three sharks I've been interested in are the blacktip reef shark, leopard shark and bonnethead shark, which of these would require the "smallest" tank/pool and which would be the "easiest" to care for? I'm ready to make the commitment of caring for one of these sharks and was just not sure which one would be best.
 

tlindsey

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Call ATM the manufacturer of acrylic aquariums from the show Tanked. They may be able to custom build you that massive cylinder type aquarium.
 
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twentyleagues

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1 any of the "active" sharks will require tanks in the 10000 gallon and up range.
2 not just based on tank size alone these are notoriously hard to keep.
3 none of the ones you listed would be easily attainable.
Look at smoothhound sharks. That is the best common name. Ive seen them called all kinds of stuff, lemon tip, "tiger", there was another ive seen that I was about to buy based on what the lfs was telling me. I called a place that I had gotten tons of coral and my catsharks from (they breed bamboo/catsharks) and after describing it they said stay away as min tank would be bigger then what I had or could get. He went into detail on how incredibly difficult these are to keep also. Average adult size is 5-6 feet. You need a swimming pool with a ton of filtration everything needs to be 0 on parameters. So if you have kept fish you understand what that means. To keep 0 readable nitrate is difficult at best. Not 5ppm, 0ppm. Daily testing and water changes would be needed. So if you say you are ready break ground on your swimming pool first. And then get your check book out for the really expensive stuff.
 
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fishhead0103666

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I recall reading a post on here I think where the poster got the response of “we don’t sell to the public” basically from atm.
 
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Backfromthedead

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I would focus on some of the smaller growing sharks more commonly kept in aquariums by enthusiasts. You could try cat sharks or bamboo sharks in a 1000-2000 gallon tank. Bigger is better of course. You might try a leopard shark. I dont know much or have ever seen much about keeping them.

Blacktips are large, powerful sharks that would require several tens of thousands of gallons to keep properly. That would be quite an undertaking.
 

Toni™

Feeder Fish
Original poster
Aug 29, 2019
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Dont think tank.....more like a swimming pool with windows!!! Need 20-30 or more feet by 15-20 feet and rounded. If cost is no issue no worries....hope you live somewhere warm or you are talking 100K plus for an indoor " pool".
Could a pool with the dimensions you mentioned house any of the sharks I mentioned for life?
 
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