Suitable saltwater sharks?

Toni™

Feeder Fish
Original poster
Aug 29, 2019
4
2
3
25
1 any of the "active" sharks will require tanks in the 10000 gallon and up range.
2 not just based on tank size alone these are notoriously hard to keep.
3 none of the ones you listed would be easily attainable.
Look at smoothhound sharks. That is the best common name. Ive seen them called all kinds of stuff, lemon tip, "tiger", there was another ive seen that I was about to buy based on what the lfs was telling me. I called a place that I had gotten tons of coral and my catsharks from (they breed bamboo/catsharks) and after describing it they said stay away as min tank would be bigger then what I had or could get. He went into detail on how incredibly difficult these are to keep also. Average adult size is 5-6 feet. You need a swimming pool with a ton of filtration everything needs to be 0 on parameters. So if you have kept fish you understand what that means. To keep 0 readable nitrate is difficult at best. Not 5ppm, 0ppm. Daily testing and water changes would be needed. So if you say you are ready break ground on your swimming pool first. And then get your check book out for the really expensive stuff.
Getting a tank/pool big enough to house these sharks shouldn't be a problem as I believe I've found a manufacturer who builds tanks/Pools big enough for them and I've found two websites that sell the sharks I'm interested in and more and how you said they're notoriously hard to keep I've heard although all sharks are sensitive to bad water qualities blacktip reef sharks are fairly hardy, is this not true then? And i'll look into smoothhound sharks further
 

Toni™

Feeder Fish
Original poster
Aug 29, 2019
4
2
3
25
I would focus on some of the smaller growing sharks more commonly kept in aquariums by enthusiasts. You could try cat sharks or bamboo sharks in a 1000-2000 gallon tank. Bigger is better of course. You might try a leopard shark. I dont know much or have ever seen much about keeping them.

Blacktips are large, powerful sharks that would require several tens of thousands of gallons to keep properly. That would be quite an undertaking.
I've seen the smaller bottom dwelling sharks like the bamboo sharks but I've always been more interested in requiem sharks and the leopard shark seems to be the sort of in between requiem and non requiem shark since it spends 10-15% of its life on the sea bed while still being more active than non requiem sharks so that might be a good introduction to requiem sharks.
 
zoomed.com
hikariusa.com
aqaimports.com
Store