Tell me about the pink tail chalceus

esoxlucius

Alligator Gar
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Hopefully my 1.83m tank with minimal wood will be enough for C. macrolepidotus. Also, I hope I'll get a more inactive specimen, as some on the thread have reported theirs to be.

E ESOX , very impressive girth on that tucanfish!
In my experience they are extremely inactive, slowly patrolling the top 6" of the tank, sometimes just staying in the same place like a statue. Mine very rarely left the top 6".

But when I'd throw a worm in, he just came to life in a split second, nailing the worm before any other fish had even sensed the splash! Great viewing.

Unfortunately this wasn't the only time when he'd come to life. If you spook this fish they can go nuts, hence the need for a fair footprint of a tank, and a good lid!

As a footnote, I would have loved to have had a few of these but read of bad things about multiples fighting. But apparently you can get away with multiples if you get around five minimum. But of course you're looking at a big tank to house that many of these extremely fast fish.

Keep us updated on yours when you get it, and time will tell whether you have the macrolepidotus or the erythrurus!
 

MultipleTankSyndrome

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Yes, that's some good advice to hear. Especially the part on the worm.
If you take a look at the Fish Story silver dollar thread, you'll see how 2 silver dollars ate a cockroach. That inspired me to feed my future chalceus big bugs whenever possible, and I can't wait for the great viewing that will come with it based on what you said.

This thread will be regularly updated as things happen, indeed. Apart from hoping I get C. macrolepidotus, I will include what I'm doing to discourage the chalceus eating its loach and Odessa barb tankmates, so others can hopefully discourage theirs from eating tankmates.
 

tiger15

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There's a lot of confusion with this fish. There are four species of Chalceus. The epakros, guaporensis, macrolepidotus and the erythrurus. I did a bit of research when I got my pinktail chalceus (macrolepidotus). As it got older it developed a lot of yellow in its pelvic fins, which I discovered the true pinktail doesn't have. I had, in fact purchased the Chalceus erythrurus, also known as the tucan fish.

In my opinion the bright yellow pelvic fins and red tail fin made this fish much more appealing than the true pinktail, the macrolepidotus. Mine got to a thick 11" or so before passing.

So, if you want the true pinktail (macrolepidotus), then order than specific fish. But I think the erythrurus is better looking. I wouldn't worry about the other two species as you don't seem to see much of them about.
There is no true pink tail, as it is a common name for several species of Chalceus. I have only seen macrolepidotus and erythrurus for sale in lfs, never the others. In term of which species is more appealing, it’s a personal taste. I have both macrolepidotus and erythrurus and they are equally pretty to me in different ways. The yellow fin has large large conspicuous scales resembling arowana. The other has more pointed nose, streamline body with a subtle red dot lateral line. Both have assymetrical tail fin that appears to be in greater contrast in the yellow fin but that can an illusion without comparing them side by side. They are very inactive fish like cichlid and that’s why I like it. I am presently housing them in separate tanks with hope to unite them in my 6 ft tank when they reach comparable size. I am wondering if the two species will get along and whether they will attain similar ultimate size.
 
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MultipleTankSyndrome

Giant Snakehead
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The inactivity could be a plus for compatibility. All the planned fish* the chalceus could be able to get its mouth around are much more active than it, which suggests to me it would likely be inclined to let them be and make my job easier.

*Except the striped kuhli loaches, but those almost exclusively inhabit the area of the tank the chalceus would virtually never go.
 
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MultipleTankSyndrome

Giant Snakehead
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Unforeseen to me at the time I made this thread, I may very well be upgrading one of my 473 liters to a custom 681 liter of 2.44m by 61 cm footprint, compared to the 1.83m by 47 cm footprint of both that 473 liter and the one it will be an upgrade from.
Perhaps if I do get it, moving the chalceus into it would be a good idea? Primarily to give it extra space and reduce chances of the fish hitting the wall.
 
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Backfromthedead

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I just got a ~4" macrolepidotus for my 135. Right now I have it with a dozen small lampeye tetras and it shows zero interest in hunting them, i believe theyre primarily insectivores. In fact, this macrolepidotus is quite active and follows the groups of tetras around, gets quite frenzied at feeding time. I kept another macrolepidotus for several years and he was a much more calm, well mannered fish, especially when given larger tanks 150g+
 

MultipleTankSyndrome

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Good to hear. Based on that, I feel more confident trusting mine with the Odessa barbs and kuhli loaches.
And I guess it makes sense too, since an insectivore fish would want more food on top of the water (insects) instead of food swimming around with or below it (small fish).

Also glad they're insectivores instead of herbivores, since that eliminates diet problems. I had considered silver dollars for my tank before I settled on the chalceus, but the diet was a pretty big hurdle that won't be present with the chalceus.
 

Backfromthedead

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Good to hear. Based on that, I feel more confident trusting mine with the Odessa barbs and kuhli loaches.
And I guess it makes sense too, since an insectivore fish would want more food on top of the water (insects) instead of food swimming around with or below it (small fish).

Also glad they're insectivores instead of herbivores, since that eliminates diet problems. I had considered silver dollars for my tank before I settled on the chalceus, but the diet was a pretty big hurdle that won't be present with the chalceus.
The ones I've had always seem to enjoy pellets, any variety offered was taken. They are pretty hardy fish once they are settled in and comfortable in their tank. Very entertaining and impressive in a medium sized community as well. They look like miniature barracudas.
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esoxlucius

Alligator Gar
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I remember way back when I got my Charlie. The stuff i'd read hinted that they were predators and that they'd take small fish if the opportunity presented itself. But mine never bothered any other fish. It just lay still at the top waiting for food to drop in.

I believe Backfromthedead Backfromthedead makes a valid point in as much that yes, they're predators, their torpedo shapes tells you that, but not primarily predators of fish, but insects on the top, and that's maybe why they are always at the surface.

One big regret regarding my big Charlie is that I had him way before I started breeding crickets. Man, he would have gone mad for those critters. In fact, chalceus are readily available in my area and I have room in my 360!

Hmm, you've got me thinking now. Below, my Charlie at about 10-11".

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