Treating fungus the safest way

Ariel_Saxon

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I purchased cardinal tetras two weeks ago and noticed a small spot on one in the beginning but thought he had just got scratched on something however several have it now and it's definitely fungus. I have a vampire shrimp, bristlenose pleco, and Kuhli loaches in the aquarium with them however they seem fine. I'm concerned about getting them treated without harming any other fish as well as my live plants. Does anyone know a safe treatment option that won't harm the fish or plants and won't stain anything as well.
 

kno4te

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Would quarantine the fish and treat with med (api fungus) then return the fish back to the main tank.
 

Ariel_Saxon

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Would quarantine the fish and treat with med (api fungus) then return the fish back to the main tank.
That's the issue! My tank has too many hiding places and live plants to catch them. I've never had trouble catching fish but these guys are super quick!
 

Ariel_Saxon

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I took what I could out and finally caught all the tetras. It's amazing how small of places they can burrow into but they are quarantined now!
 

duanes

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Many bacterial diseases present as fuzzy spots, that look very much like fungus (but aren't always fungus), so it is sometimes best to treat with a general cure type medication.
For cardinals (and many other Amazonian species) it is usually best to have your tank water always infused with tannins. These are antibacterial, and part of their natural environment.
Especially if is typical hard water, like we find in Wisconsin.
I would collect fallen leaves in autumn (oak, magnolia, maple etc), boil them (as needed), and use the brown tannin filled water as part of my general water change schedule for those black water species.
 

squint

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If it's Saprolegnia (check pictures online) the best treatment is malachite green. Try to get it without formalin or any other active ingredient as it's not useful and possible harmful.
 
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Ariel_Saxon

Black Skirt Tetra
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Oct 8, 2017
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Ariel Saxon
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Many bacterial diseases present as fuzzy spots, that look very much like fungus (but aren't always fungus), so it is sometimes best to treat with a general cure type medication.
For cardinals (and many other Amazonian species) it is usually best to have your tank water always infused with tannins. These are antibacterial, and part of their natural environment.
Especially if is typical hard water, like we find in Wisconsin.
I would collect fallen leaves in autumn (oak, magnolia, maple etc), boil them (as needed), and use the brown tannin filled water as part of my general water change schedule for those black water species.
How much do you usually use without changing the color of the water too much? I can handle a moderate amount of change if it helps the health of my fish! I actually have the leaves that do this as I use them in my betta tanks now that I think about it. I should have a few left so should I boil the leaves as well or just toss them in the tank like I do for the bettas?
 
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Ariel_Saxon

Black Skirt Tetra
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Oct 8, 2017
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Ariel Saxon
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If it's Saprolegnia (check pictures online) the best treatment is malachite green. Try to get it without formalin or any other active ingredient as it's not useful and possible harmful.
I'll check into this as I'm not familiar with it!
 

Ariel_Saxon

Black Skirt Tetra
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Oct 8, 2017
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Ariel Saxon
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Female
If it's Saprolegnia (check pictures online) the best treatment is malachite green. Try to get it without formalin or any other active ingredient as it's not useful and possible harmful.
So it's hard to determine by pictures. Whatever it is Is in the beginning stage but definitely not Ick as it has a fuzzy texture but is really small on the fish at the moment.
 

duanes

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For black water fish, I try to get the the tank water the color of weak tea, and have used old tea bags in HOB filters, when I run out of leaves.
This how the natural black water seems to look, (at least in the slow flowing streams) I've seen here in Panama, or in Colombia.
I agree about temporally using the malachite green if it is saprolegnia, or a similar infection.
For black water fish, I like to layer the bottom of the tank with leaves, to get even more tannins, or put peat moss in filter bags (almost always available at garden centers).

For me, its always about trying to replicate conditions, the species has evolved to live in nature.
A stream near Santa Marta Colombia below
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