Turtle pond

Ogertron3000

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Yes they are. The thing is they are easy to keep outside. I don't think many people in the UK actually realise this is a viable option. Lots of people have garden ponds and could probably cater for a couple of turtles. I'm trying to make it more widely known that this is a workable and enjoyable option for the turtles and the keeper.
I've always stayed clear of Facebook until recently but it's a great platform to spread a little awareness.
I'm not changing the world here but if I can help a few turtles find a good home it's well worth the time.
I spent a few years living in the U.K. In late 90s-early 2000s and I noticed they were a trendy pet back then.
Saw some very neglected ones in filthy tanks and their shells were sort of peeling off the top coating and they were all white underneath.
If they have been living in a tank for so long before you get them do you have to train or rehabilitate them in some way before they can live in the pond? I imagine it's a shock for them to suddenly be living a semi wild life after 10+ years in a tank.
 

Stanzzzz7

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I spent a few years living in the U.K. In late 90s-early 2000s and I noticed they were a trendy pet back then.
Saw some very neglected ones in filthy tanks and their shells were sort of peeling off the top coating and they were all white underneath.
If they have been living in a tank for so long before you get them do you have to train or rehabilitate them in some way before they can live in the pond? I imagine it's a shock for them to suddenly be living a semi wild life after 10+ years in a tank.
I give them a carrot soak on arrival. This is very good for turtles and all of mine get this treatment on day of collection. I also give them an acclimatising period, especially those kept in warm tanks. To be honest though they adapt very quickly and overall are very hardy and resilient.
The shell problems you described can be a number of things from poor diet lacking the vital vitamins these reptiles need, poor lighting also lacks the vitamin supply for a healthy shell. Lack of calcium can also be a problem that effects the health of the shell and can lead to calcium bone deficiency. It can also be just growth spurts. Turtles scutes are naturally shed as they grow. Dirty conditions can also cause fungal issues with shells.
When you put a turtle outside you quickly see a vast improvement in shell condition. Nothing beats the sun for shell health.
But they are very hardy and adapt very well to life outside.
 
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Stanzzzz7

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Forgot to add. The uk has very little in the way of predators for these animals to worry about.
It may be a different story in other countries like the USA where racoons could be an issue.
The trouble with my turtles is they have never developed a fear of predation to any great extent, so turtles like little Donnie would probably be an easy snack in some parts of the world. He just walks around without a care in the world.
 

Ogertron3000

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What about foxes? They killed all our chickens last summer in one night. It's funny that I didn't hear anything even though from the carnage in the garden it must have been a nasty scene.
We have a nice range of native turtles you can keep legally, the main issue is they live a long time and people get bored with them and they usually end up released into the local creek or neglected.
Haven't heard of a setup like yours but it might be useful.
 

Stanzzzz7

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Foxes tend to be nocturnal predators and this is when the terrapins are safely underwater.
I think the safest turtle pond would have and island so nothing could get to them.
Maybe a future project for me to consider should I ever encounter any issues.
 

twentyleagues

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Foxes tend to be nocturnal predators and this is when the terrapins are safely underwater.
I think the safest turtle pond would have and island so nothing could get to them.
Maybe a future project for me to consider should I ever encounter any issues.
Only issues then should be birds or if it doesnt care about swimming. We have cranes that wreak havoc on ponds here. Also small mamels like raccoons and opossum.
 

Stanzzzz7

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Only issues then should be birds or if it doesnt care about swimming. We have cranes that wreak havoc on ponds here. Also small mamels like raccoons and opossum.
Herons used to be a pain when I had fish in the pond. They completely emptied my father in laws pond of fish. He keeps turtles too now. Neither he or I have lost a turtle to a heron. I'm hoping neither of us ever do.
There are not really many things to worry about here like that.
I hear racoons can be a pain. Lovely looking things though.
 
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